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In This Issue: Products & Programs
FROM OUR SPONSORS:

Autodesk
Webinar: Integrating Computer-Aided Engineering (CAE) Tools into Existing Engineering Courses
Teaching the 21st Century Engineer
www.autodesk.com

NCEES
Free Webinar: FE and FS exams move to computer-based testing
www.ncees.org/CBT

Mathworks
Free On Demand Webinar: Making project-based learning easy and affordable
www.mathworks.com/register

ASEE Promotion:

ASEE's Exclusive New "Engineering Education Suppliers Guide"
A new online resource designed specifically to help engineering educators locate products and services for the classroom and research.
Learn More

I. Databytes

Engineering Faculty Member Salaries
in Selected Fields

ASEE collected salary data from 147 public and private engineering institutions for the 2010-2011 academic year. The salaries are based on a 9-month equivalent. They do not include administrative supplements. Median salaries rose across all engineering disciplines by 2.2% for assistant professors, 2.7% for associate professors and 3.2% for full professors.

Median Salary for Tenured/Tenure-Track Engineering Faculty: 2010-2011
Department Assistant Professor Associate Professor Full Professor
Aerospace $81,302 $99,183 $129,701
Biomedical $83,508 $98,328 $138,162
Chemical $83,488 $93,918 $129,401
Civil & Environmental $78,111 $91,324 $118,394
Computer Science (inside engineering) $86,109 $97,521 $128,226
Electrical & Computer $84,542 $96,183 $123,568
Engineering Science & Engineering Physics $86,559 $92,195 $121,979
Industrial & Manufacturing $79,094 $93,392 $126,584
Mechanical $80,193 $91,810 $119,961
Metallurgical & Materials $86,029 $97,907 $137,106


•	R&D Expenditures at Universities & Colleges, by Source of Funds: 2003-2009


Engineering's Highest Degree Maintains its Strong Attraction

ASEE's most recent survey indicates that engineering doctorates remained virtually unchanged for the fourth consecutive year. The 50 percent growth experienced from 2001 to 2007 has yielded to a current plateau of all-time highs. Doctoral enrollment in engineering continues to edge higher each fall. Thus we anticipate degrees will increase slightly over the next several years as well.

Doctoral enrollment in engineering 2001-2010
Year Doctoral enrollment in engineering
2010 9,045
2009 9,083
2008 9,086
2007 9,055
2006 8,351
2005 7,333
2004 6,604
2003 5,870
2002 5,772
2001 6,044

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Education Levels of Civilian S&E Workforce at DOD/DOD LABS (2008)

*Pie Chart in Insert shows the education levels of the U.S. S&E Workforce

Education Levels of Civilian S&E Workforce at DOD/DOD LABS (2008)

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Who is Publishing and Getting Patents?

Here is one of a number of charts in a recent NSF statistical compilation, Women, Minorities, and Persons with Disabilities in Science and Engineering.

Who is Publishing and Getting Patents?

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Median Faculty Salaries for Selected Fields: 2010-2011

ASEE collected salary data from 147 public and private engineering institutions for the 2010-2011 academic year. These salaries represent the average of the medians paid to tenured/tenure-track faculty in nine fields. The salaries are based on a 9-month equivalent. They do not include administrative supplements.

Departments Assistant Professor Associate Professor Full Professor
Aerospace $81,302 $99,183 $129,701
Biomedical $83,508 $98,328 $138,162
Chemical $83,488 $93,918 $129,401
Civil & Environmental $78,111 $91,324 $118,394
Computer Science
(inside engineering)
$86,109 $97,521 $128,226
Electrical & Computer $84,542 $96,183 $123,568
Industrial & Manufacturing $79,094 $93,392 $126,584
Mechanical $80,193 $91,810 $119,961
Metallurgical & Materials $86,029 $97,907 $137,106

 

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Advanced Technology Outpaces Other Exports

Who is Publishing and Getting Patents?

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Headcounts and Degree Production

Student to faculty ratios reflect various approaches and conditions at engineering colleges, including the influence of graduate programs, the size of the school, and whether the institution is public or private. Here are student/faculty ratios for bachelor's degrees awarded for 2008-09.

Highest Ratio of Bachelor's Degree Recipients to Faculty Members by School*
1. California State Poly. U., Pomona 7.84
2. Kettering University 7.22
3. California State University, Fresno 6.14
4. San Jose State University 5.83
5. California State University, Chico 5.82
6. Lawrence Technological University 5.77
7. U.S. Naval Academy 5.64
8. California Poly. State U., SLO 5.45
9. Purdue University, Calumet 5.44
10. University of North Florida 5.33
11. Montana State University 5.25
12. San Diego State University 5.25
13. California State Univ., Long Beach 5.11
14. Michigan Technological University 5.07
15. Ohio Northern University 5.00
16. University of Central Florida 4.98
17. Southern Illinois Univ., Edwardsville 4.93
18. Pennsylvania State University, Erie 4.71
19. Brigham Young University 4.64
20. Drexel University 4.61
*Minimum of 50 degrees awarded.
258 schools fir the criteria for this table.
Faculty refers to tenured/tenure-track faculty members.
Lowest Ratio of Bachelor's Degree Recipients to Faculty Members by School*
1. Yale University 0.91
2. California Institute of Technology 1.24
3. Howard University 1.33
4. Princeton University 1.37
5. University of California, Santa Cruz 1.39
6. Brown University 1.41
7. University of Memphis 1.42
8. University of Rochester 1.51
9. Wayne State University 1.54
10. Mercer University 1.58
11. George Washington University 1.59
12. Stanford University 1.60
13. South Dakota State University 1.65
14. Massachusetts Inst. of Technology 1.70
14. Univ. of Tennessee, Chattanooga 1.70
16. Harvard University 1.77
17. Univ. of California. Santa Barbara 1.80
17. Cleveland State University 1.80
19. William Marsh Rice University 1.81
20. University of Mississippi 1.85
*Minimum of 50 degrees awarded.
258 schools fir the criteria for this table.
Faculty refers to tenured/tenure-track faculty members.

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Lagging Engineering Fields

Engineering bachelor's degrees have increased in virtually all fields since 2004, rising from 72,893 to 78,347 in 2010. Electrical/computer engineering and computer science (inside engineering) are the notable exceptions. Excluding these fields, all other engineering fields have increased by 39 percent during this period. Electrical/computer engineering degrees declined by 28 percent while computer science declined by 34 percent. However, recent enrollment trends indicate that a rebound is on the way. Both disciplines have increased their enrollments for the past three years.

Engineering bachelor's degrees
2004 2010
All Engineering 72,893 78,347
Computer Science (inside engineering) 9,156 6,049
Electrical & Computer Engineering 21,038 15,149
All Engineering minus ECE and CS 42,699 57,149

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The Long-Term Growth of Minorities in Graduate Engineering

The percentage of underrepresented minorities (URMs) receiving graduate degrees in engineering has climbed steadily over the past four decades. Master's and doctoral degrees reached all-time highs in URM degree totals and the percentage of degrees awarded to the three groups in the URM category (African Americans, Hispanics and Native Americans). The percentage of engineering master's awarded to URMs in 2009-10 was 11.5, while 9.4 percent of engineering doctorates were awarded to URMs.

Long Term Growth of Minorities in Graduate Engineering

Source: American Society for Engineering Education, Engineering Workforce Commission, Engineering Trends

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Engineering Faculty Demographics: 2001 – 2010*

Demographic changes in the engineering faculty ranks have changed steadily, if slowly, over the past decade. Underrepresented minority representation has grown the least, as evidenced in the table below. Women comprised over 22 percent of assistant professors in fall 2010, which should diversify the upper faculty ranks in coming years. Currently only 8.1 percent of full professors and 15.2 percent of associate professors in engineering are women.

Women African American Asian Hispanic
2001 8.9% 2.1% 17.0% 3.0%
2002 9.2% 2.0% 17.8% 3.0%
2003 9.9% 2.2% 19.2% 3.1%
2004 10.4% 2.3% 20.2% 3.2%
2005 10.6% 2.4% 20.9% 3.2%
2006 11.3% 2.4% 22.0% 3.3%
2007 11.8% 2.5% 22.6% 3.4%
2008 12.3% 2.5% 22.7% 3.5%
2009 12.7% 2.5% 23.3% 3.5%
2010 13.2% 2.5% 23.9% 3.6%
*Note: Includes faculty data from University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez and Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico

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A Snapshot of ASEE's Membership Demographics

Race/Ethnicity/Gender 2005 2010
Black/Non-Hispanic 4.3% 5.1%
Hispanic 3.7% 4.3%
Asian/Pacific Islander 12.3% 13.5%
American Indian 0.5% 0.3%
White/Non-Hispanic 70.6% 68.8%
Declined to Answer 8.6% 8.1%
Female 17% 21.3%
Total Responders 6,759 8,333
Note: This data is based on responses received.
For 2005, 57.2% of the membership provided this information.
In 2010, 61.7% of the membership provided this information

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Other data trends can be viewed at www.asee.org/colleges.

 

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II. JOBS, JOBS, JOBS

Job-hunting? Here are a few current openings:

1. Architectual Engineering -- 1 opportunity

2. Engineering Technology -- 3 opportunities

3. Motorsports Engineering -- 1 opportunity

Visit here for details:
http://www.asee.org/classifieds

 

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III. Free Webinars for Engineering Educators

Integrating Computer-Aided Engineering (CAE) Tools into Existing Engineering Courses
Teaching the 21st Century Engineer

Presented by Autodesk, Inc., and ASEE

Thursday, March 22, 2012
2–3 p.m. eastern time

Intended Audience:
Mechanical engineering professors and educators of undergraduate and graduate engineering students

Overview:
Computer-aided engineering (CAE) software tools are essential to the modern design process, increasing the productivity of engineers by improving their ability to solve complex problems. The objective of the Autodesk Engineering Exploration Workshop is to increase the understanding of students and practicing engineers of how these tools work.

The workshop emphasizes the integration of CAE tools into existing engineering courses to enhance course curricula. Workshop modules address the theory, numerical methods, and application of engineering concepts within the context of Autodesk® simulation and analysis solutions. These concepts are offered in a modular format that is easy to integrate into existing curricula.

Register at:
www.autodesk.com/aseewebcast2012



 

FREE WEBINAR:
Welcome the Future FE

NCEES and ASEE are presenting a webinar to prepare you for the transition of the FE and FS exams to computer-based testing (CBT). Find out why the CBT development is happening and how the change will affect you and your students.

Thursday, April 26,1:00 p.m. EST

Register Now



 

Free On Demand MATLAB WEBINAR:
Making project-based learning easy and affordable

Discover how universities are using MATLAB® and Simulink® with Arduino, Beagle Board, Lego Mindstorms, and other very affordable hardware to teach control theory, mechatronics, circuit design, robotics, and other disciplines.

Free On Demand

Register Now

 

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IV. COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

Are editors coercing authors for citations?

A recent article in Science (3 Feb. 2012) documents how some journal editors in the social sciences coerce authors to add citations to the editor’s journal in an apparent attempt to increase the journal’s impact factor.  The authors are extending this study into the science and engineering fields and need your help.  Please follow this link to an introduction to their survey and the survey itself.
http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/foheng

 

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V. FACULTY WORKSHOPS

ASEE K-12 Workshop - Proposals Sought

ASEE has two upcoming workshops.
For more information, please click on the hyperlinks below:

  1. MAKING THE TRANSITION TO ACTIVE LEARNING
    April 1, 2012, 8:00 AM - 3:00 PM


  2. ACADEMIC ENGINEERING LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP
    April 19, 2012
    8:00 AM - 3:00 PM

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VI. SOUND OFF!

Do you have a comment or suggestion for Connections?

Please let us know. Email us at: connections@asee.org. Thanks.

 

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Connections - Providing Interesting and Useful Information for Engineering Faculty American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE)