Professional and Technical Division Awards

Aerospace Division - John Leland Atwood Award

The John Leland Atwood Award of the ASEE Aerospace Division and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) was established in 1985. Lee Atwood entered aviation when it was little more than experimentation in a daring sport, though he believed that this new field would be the cornerstone of our security and serve as a principal medium of world commerce. As an outstanding engineer and leader of a great industrial corporation, Atwood played a major role in the development of aviation and aerospace technologies for more than 50 years.

The Atwood Award is bestowed annually upon an outstanding aerospace engineering educator in recognition of the educator's contributions to the profession.

The Award: The award is endowed by Rockwell International and consists of a $2,000 honorarium and a certificate. In addition, the AIAA presents a suitably engraved medal and certificate at the annual Aerospace Sciences Meeting.

Qualifications: This award recognizes the accomplishments of a superior aerospace engineering educator and his or her contributions to the profession and, therefore, requires demonstration of improvements of lasting influence to aerospace engineering education through:

  • research, technical textbooks or the introduction of experimental courses or experimental instructional methods;
  • technical articles on education or the introduction of new laboratory or teaching equipment;
  • demonstration of success as a teacher and/or significant progress in aerospace engineering education and its administration;
  • contributions and participation in pertinent educational and professional societies or other organizations important to aerospace engineering education.

This award shall be given to an aerospace engineering educator who, at the time of selection, is engaged in teaching and research in some field of aerospace engineering; however, in exceptional circumstances, it may be awarded to others who have made a substantial contribution to aerospace engineering education.

Eligibility: The recipient will be expected to participate in any subsequent ceremony which the AIAA may choose. The award can be received only once by any individual.

Nomination: Nominations may be made by any member of ASEE and/or AIAA.

Past Award Winners


ASEE Electrical and Computer Engineering Division - Frederick Emmons Terman Award

Nominations for this award are accepted until April 15th of each year.

The Frederick Emmons Terman Award of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Division was established in 1969. Although Frederick Emmons Terman served Stanford University in many capacities, including head of the electrical engineering department, dean of the school of engineering, provost, vice president, and acting president, it was while he was an instructor and professor that he guided engineering students William Hewlett and David Packard, eventually urging them to set up their successful partnership. In 1942, as a result of directing the Harvard University Radio Research Laboratory, which was responsible for developing countermeasures against enemy radar, Dr. Terman received an honorary doctor's degree from Harvard, was decorated by the British government and was awarded the Presidential Medal for Merit, the highest award for civilians in the United States.

The Terman Award is bestowed annually upon an outstanding young electrical/computer engineering educator in recognition of the educator's contributions to the profession.

The Award: The award is sponsored by the Hewlett-Packard Company and consists of a $5,000 honorarium, a gold-plated medal, a bronze replica, a presentation scroll and reimbursement of travel expenses for the awardee to attend the ASEE Frontiers in Education Conference, where the award is presented.

Qualifications: In light of the successes of Dr. Terman and those of his students, the recipients of this award must meet the following requirements:

  • Be a principal author of an electrical/computer engineering textbook, or other copyrighted electrical/computer engineering curriculum materials, which have been:
    • published/disseminated prior to June 1 in the year the author becomes 40 years of age, and recognized by peers to be outstanding for its original contribution to the field.
  • Be additionally recognized for achievements in teaching, research, guidance of students and related activities.
  • Be an electrical/computer engineering educator under 45 years of age on June 1 of the year in which the award selection is made.
  • Be a full-time member of a college faculty and actively engaged in teaching in the United States or Canada at the time that the award winner is selected.

Past Award Winners


Mechanical Engineering Division - Ralph Coats Roe Award

Cofounder of Burns and Roe, Inc., Ralph Coats Roe was an avid investigator of better methods. He held nearly 50 patents generally relating to improvements for power plants and air conditioning. As recipient of the ASME George Westinghouse Gold Medal, Mr. Roe was cited for pioneering in the design and construction of highly efficient power plants and advanced desalting processes and for inspiring colleagues by great achievements through self education and highly sophisticated technologies

The Award: The award is sponsored by the Mechanical Engineering Division and consists of a $10,000 honorarium, a plaque and travel expense reimbursement for attendance at the ASEE Annual Conference. The award is funded by an endowment provided by Burns and Roe, Inc. in honor of Kenneth A. Roe's distinguished father.

Qualifications: The award recognizes a mechanical engineering educator who is an outstanding teacher and who has made the following notable professional contributions:

  • The professional contribution may be in any appropriate category including excellence in classroom and laboratory teaching; developing a significant technique or method of analysis, procedure or synthesis; causing learning to take place through contact with students; involving students and colleagues with innovative aspects of design through problems that are relevant to real life situations; conceiving an idea of great importance to the advancement of the engineering profession or engineering education; teaching, directing or conducting significant research; providing outstanding administrative leadership; creating an important invention; carrying out distinguished service and leadership to the college, the community, the nation or to mankind.
  • Only mechanical engineering educators who are known for their excellence in teaching are eligible, and those nominated should have exhibited this outstanding performance for at least a decade.
  • Except for in an emergency, the recipient must attend the Mechanical Engineering Division award ceremony at the ASEE Annual Conference.
  • The recipient must be a full-time member of a college faculty and actively engaged in teaching at the time that the award winner is selected.

Nomination: Nominations may be made by any member of the Mechanical Engineering Division. The nominee need not be a member of the division or of ASEE.

Past Award Winners


Nuclear Engineering Division - Glenn Murphy Award

Glenn Murphy was an engineering faculty member at Iowa State University from 1932 until his death in 1978. He attained the rank of Anson Marston Distinguished Professor of Engineering and served as the head of Aeronautical Engineering, Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. He organized the Department of Nuclear Engineering and served as its head for fourteen years. At the time of his death he was coordinator of the Engineering Education Projects Office in the dean's office at Iowa State University. Dr. Murphy was very active in ASEE, having served as its President in 1962 and Vice President for two terms, 1957-59 and 1965-68.

In honor of Glenn Murphy, this award, endowed by the Friends of Glenn Murphy, the Edison Electric Institute and Iowa State University, is made annually to a distinguished nuclear engineering educator in recognition of notable professional contributions to the teaching of undergraduate and/or graduate nuclear engineering students.

The Award: The award, consisting of a $750 honorarium and a certificate, is sponsored by former students and friends of Dr. Murphy in recognition of his many contributions to engineering education in general and nuclear engineering in particular.

Qualifications: Qualifications for the Glenn Murphy Award include the following:

  • The recipient must have made notable professional contributions to the teaching aspects of nuclear engineering, including one or more of the following:
    • Excelling in classroom and laboratory teaching;
    • Making outstanding contributions to technical literature;
    • Developing a significant technique or method of analysis, procedure or synthesis;
    • Involving students and colleagues with innovative aspects of design through problems that are relevant to real life situations;
    • Conceiving an idea of great importance to the advancement of the engineering profession or engineering education; and
    • Directing or conducting significant research or administrative activities
  • Only those educators who are responsible for contributing to the education of nuclear engineering students are eligible.
  • The recipient must be a member of ASEE and a full-time member of a college faculty and actively engaged in teaching in the United States or Canada at the time of the award selection.
  • The recipient, except for in emergency conditions, must attend the Nuclear Engineering Division award ceremony at the ASEE Annual Conference.

Past Award Winners

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