I have always enjoyed tutoring and teaching people, even when I was a junior engineer in the field. Nothing makes me happier than seeing students grasp the topic of discussion and actually be able to apply it. I also find it exhilarating and fun to mentor students - both overachievers and underachievers. My objective is to make my students realize their full potential. Therefore, no other career can be as fulfilling and rewarding as an engineering educator. As, I occasionally joke with my students and say, “You will engineer solutions to improve people’s quality of life, while I engineer engineers.”

I tell all my students there are three rules to success, by which I live: 1) set goals rather than dreams; 2) there is no substitute to hard work, i.e. there is no smart and stupid; and 3) grit, i.e. be consistent, persistent, and never give up.

Guiding by example

I try to impart impartial, objective, logical thinking in my students. I train my students to look at the problem at hand without preconceived precautions and try to approach a solution that is innovative and meets all requirements. I find guiding by example is the most effective way. For example, my students can find me either in my office or my lab almost every day, which portrays to them my work ethic and dedication. They admire and value these attributes and they strive to improve their work ethic and commitment to their goals. I guide students based on their individual needs and goals. I do that by getting to know the students and learn where they come from and where they want to go. I guide them by allowing them to see the road to their goals and motivate them to work hard until they reach it. I also advise my students not be afraid of failure since it is important to enjoy success.

Integrating teaching and research

Since I am at the beginning of my academic career, I try to keep a good balance between teaching and research. As a matter of fact, I try to integrate both together by bringing lessons learned and research outcomes from the lab to the lecture room. I view being a good teacher requires me to be a good researcher. The challenges of being a good teacher is to motivate the students and stay relevant to contemporary issues (technical and nontechnical). As for the challenge of being a good researcher, the challenge is continuously looking for funding to support students and equipping my lab with state-of-the-art equipment to be able to push the boundaries of science and engineering.

ASEE membership

I enjoy attending the regional conference and receiving Prism, as well as email updates.
ASEE should consider holding engineering competitions on emerging fields such as, but not limited to, nanotechnology, biomedical, bioengineering, etc.

Outside of work I enjoy reading and going to church. 

I have always enjoyed tutoring and teaching people, even when I was a junior engineer in the field. Nothing makes me happier than seeing students grasp the topic of discussion and actually be able to apply it. I also find it exhilarating and fun to mentor students - both overachievers and underachievers. My objective is to make my students realize their full potential. Therefore, no other career can be as fulfilling and rewarding as an engineering educator. As, I occasionally joke with my students and say, “You will engineer solutions to improve people’s quality of life, while I engineer engineers.”

I tell all my students there are three rules to success, by which I live: 1) set goals rather than dreams; 2) there is no substitute to hard work, i.e. there is no smart and stupid; and 3) grit, i.e. be consistent, persistent, and never give up.

Guiding by example

I try to impart impartial, objective, logical thinking in my students. I train my students to look at the problem at hand without preconceived precautions and try to approach a solution that is innovative and meets all requirements. I find guiding by example is the most effective way. For example, my students can find me either in my office or my lab almost every day, which portrays to them my work ethic and dedication. They admire and value these attributes and they strive to improve their work ethic and commitment to their goals. I guide students based on their individual needs and goals. I do that by getting to know the students and learn where they come from and where they want to go. I guide them by allowing them to see the road to their goals and motivate them to work hard until they reach it. I also advise my students not be afraid of failure since it is important to enjoy success.

Integrating teaching and research

Since I am at the beginning of my academic career, I try to keep a good balance between teaching and research. As a matter of fact, I try to integrate both together by bringing lessons learned and research outcomes from the lab to the lecture room. I view being a good teacher requires me to be a good researcher. The challenges of being a good teacher is to motivate the students and stay relevant to contemporary issues (technical and nontechnical). As for the challenge of being a good researcher, the challenge is continuously looking for funding to support students and equipping my lab with state-of-the-art equipment to be able to push the boundaries of science and engineering.

ASEE membership

I enjoy attending the regional conference and receiving Prism, as well as email updates.
ASEE should consider holding engineering competitions on emerging fields such as, but not limited to, nanotechnology, biomedical, bioengineering, etc.

Outside of work I enjoy reading and going to church.