I was influenced to become an educator by a number of factors, including influential faculty during my studies, a passion for teaching born out of running soccer camps in college, a mother who was a professor, and a recognition of the power of impacting the next generation to change the world.


My colleagues would describe me as passionate, innovative, and resilient. And I’m flattered by what my students have recently said of me on evaluations, including, “Dr. Lewis is one of the most passionate professor I have had throughout my education” and “Dr. Lewis is another of those individuals who loves his subject, and this makes for exciting lectures which stick with you.”


Many students have noble aspirations and want to be a leader, but aren't sure how to lead themselves yet. Each student already is a leader of at least one – him or herself. In this context, I try to pass on certain practices, including discipline, commitment, character, and integrity that will help the students beyond their own engineering competencies. I instill in them that persistence brings about character and character will increase the impact a student can make over his or her lifetime. I also share Proverbs 13:19a with them where King Solomon said "the desire accomplished is sweet to the soul." When I shake their hands on graduation day many of them remember this principle and articulate how true it is after four years of hard work.


I routinely ask our industry research partners what they are looking for in new engineers. I also bring in experienced engineers to talk with my classes and share anecdotal insights that many of my former students send to me about their own career paths, successes, and failures.


Balancing priorities


I think too many people think teaching-vs.-research is a zero-sum game. I think you can be good at both. But it requires a different mindset, one focused on integrating research and education rather than keeping them separate. Leveraging research for more effective classroom experiences and then leveraging more effective classroom experiences to train better researchers allows for creative ways to solve this non-zero-sum game.


ASEE Annual Conference


I walk away from every ASEE Conference with a full cup. The networking and educational brilliance I get to interact with always inspires me to orchestrate learning better. The excellence that comes with the ASEE brand is always a reminder of how important our jobs are. To the extent that ASEE can continue highlighting best practices in educational practice, curriculum reform, and other categories it will greatly benefit members.


Outside of work I love dating my wife and I am honored to be a dad to two amazing kids. I enjoy all kinds of physical endurance challenges. My wife and I serve in the college ministry at our church where we get to interact with hundreds of college students every week and pretend like we are still young! 

I was influenced to become an educator by a number of factors, including influential faculty during my studies, a passion for teaching born out of running soccer camps in college, a mother who was a professor, and a recognition of the power of impacting the next generation to change the world.


My colleagues would describe me as passionate, innovative, and resilient. And I’m flattered by what my students have recently said of me on evaluations, including, “Dr. Lewis is one of the most passionate professor I have had throughout my education” and “Dr. Lewis is another of those individuals who loves his subject, and this makes for exciting lectures which stick with you.”


Many students have noble aspirations and want to be a leader, but aren't sure how to lead themselves yet. Each student already is a leader of at least one – him or herself. In this context, I try to pass on certain practices, including discipline, commitment, character, and integrity that will help the students beyond their own engineering competencies. I instill in them that persistence brings about character and character will increase the impact a student can make over his or her lifetime. I also share Proverbs 13:19a with them where King Solomon said "the desire accomplished is sweet to the soul." When I shake their hands on graduation day many of them remember this principle and articulate how true it is after four years of hard work.


I routinely ask our industry research partners what they are looking for in new engineers. I also bring in experienced engineers to talk with my classes and share anecdotal insights that many of my former students send to me about their own career paths, successes, and failures.


Balancing priorities


I think too many people think teaching-vs.-research is a zero-sum game. I think you can be good at both. But it requires a different mindset, one focused on integrating research and education rather than keeping them separate. Leveraging research for more effective classroom experiences and then leveraging more effective classroom experiences to train better researchers allows for creative ways to solve this non-zero-sum game.


ASEE Annual Conference


I walk away from every ASEE Conference with a full cup. The networking and educational brilliance I get to interact with always inspires me to orchestrate learning better. The excellence that comes with the ASEE brand is always a reminder of how important our jobs are. To the extent that ASEE can continue highlighting best practices in educational practice, curriculum reform, and other categories it will greatly benefit members.


Outside of work I love dating my wife and I am honored to be a dad to two amazing kids. I enjoy all kinds of physical endurance challenges. My wife and I serve in the college ministry at our church where we get to interact with hundreds of college students every week and pretend like we are still young!