ASEE will soon publish a report on faculty engagement, co-authored by Leah Jamieson, the John A. Edwardson Dean of Engineering at Purdue University and Jack Lohmann, Vice Provost for Faculty and Academic Development and Professor at Georgia Tech.
 
To meet President Obama’s retention and graduation goals, engineering and engineering technology educators must be engaged with students and prepared to teach them in new ways. 
 
As engineering careers have become increasingly collaborative, multidisciplinary, entrepreneurial, and global and as the pace of change of technology has accelerated, the expectations for engineering education have expanded.  To the technical foundations we now add interdisciplinary breadth, communication and teamwork, ingenuity and creativity, and environmental and ethical leadership, among other traits.
 
There exist gaps in our universities between our desire to graduate diverse talent and our ability to deliver, and our encouragement for educational innovation and our follow-through to support it.  It is clear that “business as usual” will not ensure success in meeting the growing demands, much less a place at the forefront of the global engineering education community.  If a “grand challenge” for engineering education is “How will we teach—and how will our students learn—all that is needed for the challenges of today and tomorrow?” then the issue is not simply a need for more educational innovations.  The issue is a need for more educational innovations that have a significant impact on student learning and performance, whether it is through widespread and efficient implementation of proven practices or critical advancements in ideas, methods, or technologies. 
 
The report will be published on the ASEE website in the spring of 2012.  

ASEE will soon publish a report on faculty engagement, co-authored by Leah Jamieson, the John A. Edwardson Dean of Engineering at Purdue University and Jack Lohmann, Vice Provost for Faculty and Academic Development and Professor at Georgia Tech.
 
To meet President Obama’s retention and graduation goals, engineering and engineering technology educators must be engaged with students and prepared to teach them in new ways. 
 
As engineering careers have become increasingly collaborative, multidisciplinary, entrepreneurial, and global and as the pace of change of technology has accelerated, the expectations for engineering education have expanded.  To the technical foundations we now add interdisciplinary breadth, communication and teamwork, ingenuity and creativity, and environmental and ethical leadership, among other traits.
 
There exist gaps in our universities between our desire to graduate diverse talent and our ability to deliver, and our encouragement for educational innovation and our follow-through to support it.  It is clear that “business as usual” will not ensure success in meeting the growing demands, much less a place at the forefront of the global engineering education community.  If a “grand challenge” for engineering education is “How will we teach—and how will our students learn—all that is needed for the challenges of today and tomorrow?” then the issue is not simply a need for more educational innovations.  The issue is a need for more educational innovations that have a significant impact on student learning and performance, whether it is through widespread and efficient implementation of proven practices or critical advancements in ideas, methods, or technologies. 
 
The report will be published on the ASEE website in the spring of 2012.