Special

ASEE President's Award

This award recognizes those organizations that make the best use of print, broadcast, or electronic media to (a) encourage K-12 students to enter engineering schools and pursue engineering careers and/or (b) influence public opinion and create recognition of the critical role that engineering plays in today's technology driven society. The award is funded by the ASEE Engineering Deans Council and consists of a suitably inscribed plaque that is presented during the ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition.

Criteria:

  • One award will be given annually to the organization (public or private) judged to have made the best use during the preceding year of print, broadcast or electronic media to
    a. encourage K-12 students to enter engineering schools and to pursue an engineering career; or
    b. influence public opinion and to create recognition of the critical role that engineering plays in today's technology driven society.
  • Originality will be a key factor in the selection of the winning entry.

Nomination: Any member of ASEE may nominate an organization for this award. In addition, nominations can be submitted by the organization that sponsored or created the media for which the nomination is made. The award may be given in any year that the selection committee chooses a recipient from the candidates nominated and successful candidates will remain in the pool for one additional year. If no winning candidate is selected, the award will not be given.

Past Award Winners


ASEE Lifetime Achievement Award in Engineering Education

The ASEE Lifetime Achievement Award recognizes individuals who have retired or who are near the ends of their careers for sustained contributions to education in the fields of engineering and/or engineering technology. The contributions may be in teaching, education, research, administration or educational programs, professional service, or any combination thereof.

The award was established through the efforts of the ASEE Lifetime Achievement Award Steering Committee and funded by an endowment created for this award by the contributions of ASEE Life Members and like-minded, Not-Yet-Life Member Fellows.

The Award: The recipient will receive a $1,000 honorarium, travel assistance up to $1,000 for travel to the ASEE Annual Conference to receive the award, and a commemorative plaque.

Eligibility: Candidates shall have demonstrated sustained contributions to education in the fields of engineering and/or engineering technology throughout their careers. These contributions may be in any combination of the following:

  • Demonstrated excellence in teaching either undergraduate or graduate courses
  • Mentorship of students beyond the classroom
  • Important contributions to the understanding of teaching and learning through the conduct and publication of educational research
  • Demonstrated leadership through the administration of departments, schools or college of engineering or engineering technology
  • Volunteer activity and leadership in education societies

The candidates will be retired or near retirement and will have devoted their careers primarily to engineering education. ASEE membership is not required.

This award was presented for the first time in June 2012.

Past Award Winners


Chester F. Carlson Award

Chester F. Carlson is noted for his invention of xerography, the process of dry copying using electrostatic charges to transfer printing halftones to paper. In 1944, he demonstrated his technique to Battelle Memorial Institute, which undertook the development of the process. Fifteen years later, the first office copier was introduced by Haloid Xerox.

The Chester F. Carlson Award is presented annually to an individual innovator in engineering education who, by motivation and ability to extend beyond the accepted tradition, has made a significant contribution to the profession.

The Award: The award is sponsored by the Xerox Corporation and consists of a $1,000 honorarium and a plaque.

Qualifications: Nominees must demonstrate the ability to recognize the influence of a changing sociological and technological environment on academic customs. The nominee for this award will possess the following characteristics:

  • Creative innovation--a single unique, significant contribution to engineering and engineering technology education carried to the stage of innovated action.
  • Responsiveness to need--recognition of an educational need, plus design and implementation of a suitable response.
  • Implementation of a concept--a clear statement of a rationale carried forward with integrity.
  • External impact--influence extending beyond the home institution.
  • Effectiveness in overcoming barriers--skill and persistence in causing change.

Eligibility: Individual innovators in engineering or engineering technology education are eligible. The nomination form and supporting documents should clearly show the relationship of the nominee's innovative activity to engineering education.

Nomination: Along with the nomination form, forward a curriculum vitae of no more than one single-spaced page describing the nominee as a professional. Complete specific information using no more than five single-spaced pages to describe how the nominee meets each of the five qualifying criteria in a specific innovation in engineering or engineering technology education. Attach no more than five letters of recommendation. No late letters will be considered.

Past Award Winners


Isadore T. Davis Award for Excellence in Collaboration of Engineering Education and Industry

The Isadore T. Davis Award for Excellence in Collaboration of Engineering Education and Industry is jointly established and endowed by ASEE’s Corporate Member Council, Engineering Deans Council, Engineering Technology Council, Engineering Research Council, and Division of College-Industry Partnerships.

The Isadore T. Davis Award is founded to celebrate the spirit and leadership of individuals who make a mark in the collaborative efforts of engineering or engineering technology education with industry toward the improvement of partnerships or collaborations. The outcome for this award is to promote collaborations/partnerships between engineering or engineering technology education and industry to improve learning, scholarship and engagement practices within the engineering education community.

Award Description: While the collaborative project being honored may have a large group of individuals associated with it, the award committee will select no more than two individuals to honor in one year for this award. The award consists of a commemorative plaque and a $1,000 honorarium to be divided between the honorees.

Criteria and Qualifications: An individual or team who has achieved excellence in collaboration between engineering or engineering technology education and industry will be considered for this award. The award will be given to a faculty member, researcher, administrator, industry employee, industry leader or organizational Team.

This award recognizes an individual or individuals that promote partnerships or collaborations between engineering or engineering technology educators and industry to improve learning, scholarship and engagement practices within the engineering education community. Partnerships or collaborations could include areas of championing career development for our youth, improving the plight of our protected classes, issues of diversity in the workplace, unique collaborative scholarship of discovery or applied research, in addition to many other areas of engineering or engineering technology education and industry collaboration and/or partnerships. 

This award recognizes outstanding achievement in one or more of the following activities specifically related to collaboration or partnerships between engineering or engineering technology education and industry, government and other non-government agencies.

Accomplishments (as appropriate)

  • As an educator: Engineering, engineering technology, and other faculty (ASEE members) are eligible and who have demonstrated evidence of contributions to improvements in engineering and engineering technology education through productive collaborations or partnerships with industry, government or other non government agencies.
  • As a researcher: faculty or other academics (ASEE members) are eligible and who have demonstrated evidence of excellence in research or scholarship through a collaboration or partnership with industry, government or other non government organizations.
  • As an administrator: administrators (ASEE Members) are eligible who have demonstrative evidence of excellence in a program or project with industry that resulted in contributions to engineering and engineering technology education or evidence of commitment of promoting and supporting industry and engineering and engineering technology education collaboration or partnership in their institution.
  • As an industry leader or employer: industry leader or employee or employer (ASEE member or corporate membership) who have demonstrated excellence in a program or project with engineering or engineering technology education; industry leader or employee or employer who have demonstrated excellence in engineering or engineering technology collaboration or partnership in their company or organization.

Nominations: Follow the general nomination instructions with these exceptions:

Who May Nominate:
Nominations may be made by any person, organization, or group, except members of the Isadore T. Davis Award Committee. Members of the Isadore T. Davis Award Committee, in any capacity, are not eligible to make nominations or receive this award while they serve on the award committee. No individual shall receive the award more than once. Self nominations are allowed.

ASEE Awards Nomination Form: The date of birth is not required.

Curriculum Vitae or Resumé/Bio:
In addition, this document should include the industry leader or employer nominee's accomplishments in industry and especially all activities related to collaboration between engineering and/or engineering technology education and industry. An equivalent document to the curriculum vitae may be substituted, such as a resumé.

Accomplishments:

  1. The accomplishments section must indicate the nominee's role in collaboration: as an educator, as a researcher, as an administrator, or as an industry leader or employer or a combination. The nominee's ASEE member number or the corporate membership number should be listed.
  2. The accomplishments section must refer ONLY to accomplishments related to collaboration between engineering and/or engineering technology education and industry.

About Isadore T. Davis

Past Award Winners


Clement J. Freund Award

This Award is offered biennially in odd numbered calendar years. The nomination process for the 2015 award will begin in November 2014 and close January 15, 2015.

Clement J. Freund (1895-1984) was one of the pioneers in the field of cooperative engineering education. He chaired an ASEE committee on the aims and ideals of cooperative engineering education, which produced the report entitled "The Cooperative System-A Manifesto." The report is still accepted as the official statement of the Cooperative and Experiential Education Division policy.

The Clement J. Freund Award honors an individual in business, industry, government or education who has made a significant positive impact on cooperative education programs in engineering and engineering technology. This award is now offered every odd numbered calendar year.

The Award: The awardee receives a $2,000 honorarium, reimbursement of travel expenses to attend the ASEE Annual Conference to receive the award, a plaque and a certificate of achievement.

Established in 1979 by the Cooperative and Experiential Education Division of ASEE to commemorate its 50th anniversary, the award has been funded through an endowment provided by the following contributors: Caterpillar Tractor Company, Danly Machine Corporation, Diamond Shamrock Corporation, Dow Chemical U.S.A., John Deere, Sundstrand Corporation and Union Carbide Corporation.

Qualifications: Nominees need not have been directly involved in cooperative education but must have exerted a profound influence on the betterment of the movement. Cooperative education, as used in this text, refers only to programs in engineering and engineering technology that adhere to the criteria adopted by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). Accomplishments may include, but are not restricted to the following:

  • Long and dedicated service to the practice and philosophy of cooperative education and to students in the programs through administration, counseling and fostering of high quality cooperative programs as an employer or an academician.
  • Initiation, promotion and support of an extensive, quality cooperative program in business, government, industry or education that clearly benefits engineering and engineering technology.
  • Administration or executive support at the highest levels in business, industry, government or education of a cooperative program.
  • Publication of recognized and widely distributed books or articles contributing to the understanding and growth of the concept of cooperative education as defined by the criteria adopted by ABET.
  • Exertion of influence on legislation at the national level which is clearly beneficial to cooperative education.

Eligibility: Any person whose professional duties and accomplishments have furthered cooperative education programs in engineering or engineering technology is eligible for the award.

Nomination: Follow the general nomination instructions with these exceptions:

  • Publications and accomplishments need to be included only if appropriate.
  • Nominators must be active members of ASEE or have been members during their professional career.
  • No member may nominate a family member or an immediate supervisor or subordinate in his/her own organization.

Past Award Winners


DuPont Minorities in Engineering Award

Established in 1979, this award is intended to recognize the importance of student diversity by ethnicity and gender in science, engineering and technology. The DuPont Minorities in Engineering Award is conferred for outstanding achievements by an engineering or engineering technology educator in increasing student diversity within engineering and engineering technology programs.

It is intended that this award be given to engineering or engineering technology educators who, as part of their educational activity, either assume or are charged with the responsibility for motivating underrepresented students to enter and continue in engineering or engineering technology curricula at the college or university level, graduate or undergraduate.

The Award: The award is endowed by DuPont and consists of a $1,500 honorarium, a certificate and a grant of $500 for travel expenses to the ASEE Annual Conference.

Qualifications: The candidate must demonstrate leadership in the conception, organization and operation of precollege and college activities designed to increase participation of underrepresented students in engineering or engineering technology. This should be evidenced by increases in enrollment and graduation rates of underrepresented students. All engineering educators on the faculties of U.S. engineering or engineering technology colleges are eligible.

In exceptional circumstances, candidates who are not engineering or engineering technology educators, but who have made extraordinary contributions to increasing student diversity within engineering or engineering technology programs through their roles in either the private or public sector, may be considered for this award.

Nomination: Nominations for outstanding performance (meaning successful motivation of underrepresented candidates to enter and complete engineering or engineering technology curricula) are to be submitted using the nomination form with the specified information attached. The accomplishments section should include evidence of significant growth rates of underrepresented graduates during the years of the nominee's influence.

Past Award Winners


John L. Imhoff Global Excellence Award for Industrial Engineering Education

An engineering educator for more than 50 years, John L. Imhoff thrived on the global impact potential of the industrial engineering discipline. His vision encompassed the undergraduate, graduate, and teaching levels. He believed that global sharing through educational channels would lead to greater cooperation and understanding. He was very committed to students within the classroom and was passionate about professional student organizations as well as faculty involvement within those organizations. He encouraged students to travel abroad on work/study programs; encouraged them to take summer jobs abroad; and encouraged faculty to bring in speakers who had worked abroad to share their experiences.

The Award:
Endowed from the estate of the late Professor John L. Imhoff, this award recognizes an individual who has made outstanding contributions in the field of industrial engineering education and has demonstrated global cooperation and understanding through leadership and other initiatives. The award consists of a $1,000 honorarium.

Qualifications and Eligibility Requirements:
This award is presented annually to an individual who has made significant contributions to the industrial engineering discipline, who exemplifies the highest standards of the professorate in industrial engineering, and has demonstrated global cooperation and understanding through leadership and other initiatives.

To be eligible, nominees must:
1. be a current industrial engineering faculty member in an accredited institution;
2. have at least five years teaching experience in an engineering school;
3. demonstrated excellence in teaching;
4. have demonstrated Dr. Imhoff’s vision for global cooperation and understanding through leadership and other initiatives;
5. be committed to the success of students both in the classroom and in professional engineering student organizations, and by encouraging global understanding; and
6. be a current member of ASEE.

Nominations/Renominations:
This award follows the general ASEE nomination guidelines. All nominations will be automatically carried over for at least one year following the initial submission. For renominations, pertinent updated nomination information should be submitted by the nominator.

About John L. Imhoff

Past Award Winners


Sharon Keillor Award for Women in Engineering Education

This award recognizes and honors outstanding women engineering educators. The award consists of an honorarium of $2,000 and an appropriately inscribed plaque which is presented annually at the ASEE Annual Conference.

Eligibility: The award is to recognize and honor a woman engineering educator who has an outstanding record in teaching engineering students, and reasonable performance histories of research and service within an engineering school. Nominees will hold an earned doctoral degree in an engineering discipline, or in an engineering related field of natural science, including mathematics, and will have at least five years of teaching experience in an engineering school.

Nominations and Selection: Nominations will be made following the general nomination instructions (see http://www.asee.org/member-resources/awards/guidelines/awards-nomination-guidelines). All nominations will be carried over for at least one year following the initial submission. Pertinent updated nomination information should be submitted by the nominator.

Past Award Winners


Meriam/Wiley Distinguished Author Award

This Award is offered biennially in even numbered calendar years. The nomination process for the 2016 award will begin in November 2015 and close January 15, 2016.

Engineering textbooks have long played a vital role in the education of engineering students and promise to continue their key influence in the years ahead. In order to maximize the influence of a technical book, not only should its subject be presented with clarity and conciseness, but the applications of its theory to relevant phases of engineering practice should also be illustrated with interesting, realistic and contemporary examples. This close connection between theory and practice provides a strong incentive for the student and is a key factor in determining the success of the book.

The need to emphasize the close coupling between theory and practice in basic engineering science courses was specially recognized by Professor James L. Meriam and John Wiley & Sons in the early 1950s. The resulting texts on engineering mechanics that have been authored and published by this team have set standards of excellence in the field both nationally and internationally. The author and publisher wish to share some of the benefits of their work with colleagues in engineering education and have established an award to recognize excellence in the authorship of engineering books.

The Award: The award consists of a $2,000 honorarium and a certificate. It will be presented biennially at the ASEE Annual Conference if distinguished authorship is clearly established.

Qualifications: The award is to be given for work that contributes to the advancement of technical and professional competence at the undergraduate or graduate level.

  • Although intended primarily for books written for use in professional engineering schools, books that contribute to the advancement of engineering technology are not ruled out, provided the treatment contains a strong component of analytical contribution.
  • Excluded, on the other hand, are works that represent descriptive or how-to-do activities.
  • The award encourages new contributions rather than recognizes previous contributions of proven merit. For this reason only first edition books published within four years of the award deadline are eligible.
  • Strong consideration is to be given to the excellence of illustrations that portray or explain engineering components or systems relevant to the subject of the book.
  • Finally, student reaction to the book will constitute an important element in the evaluation process.

Nomination: To aid the Award Committee in its evaluations, it is essential that the committee members be furnished examination copies of the book. Please make arrangements with the publisher to be prepared to send copies to each of the committee members upon receipt of their names and addresses. Include the name, address and telephone number of the publisher's representative with the nomination package.

Past Award Winners


National Engineering Economy Teaching Excellence Award

This Award is offered biennially in even numbered calendar years. The nomination process for the 2016 award will begin in November 2015 and close January 15, 2016.

The National Engineering Economy Teaching Excellence Award recognizes an individual who has demonstrated classroom teaching excellence and teaching scholarship in engineering economy. The award consists of a $10,000 honorarium, an inscribed plaque, and a $1,000 stipend to assist the award recipient in travel costs to attend the ASEE Annual Conference where the award will be presented. The award will be presented biennially at the ASEE Awards Banquet held during the Annual Conference. However, if a qualified candidate is not identified in any given year, the award selection committee may defer making the award. The award may be received only once.

Eligibility: Those eligible to receive the award are, or have been, full-time engineering teachers who have taught engineering economy courses in an ABET or CEAB accredited engineering or engineering technology curriculum. They may be current or emeritus faculty members who have taught engineering economy frequently for a substantial period of time.

Classroom Performance

  • Possess and be able to communicate broad and accurate knowledge of engineering economy to students.
  • Show evidence of outstanding classroom performance using regular evaluations by students and by faculty. If relevant, other measures of classroom performance may also be included.
  • Possess a sense of proportion, stressing fundamentals and basic underlying truths.
  • Prepare assignments that challenge students, demanding thinking and learning.
  • Demonstrate an intense interest and enthusiasm in engineering economy and enhance the learning process through real-life examples and illustrations to fully motivate students.
  • Nominee’s efforts have increased awareness and extended the reach of engineering economy concepts into the broader engineering curriculum.
  • Nominee has a long and distinguished record of teaching effectiveness for at least a decade.

Teaching Scholarship Contributions

  • Demonstrate effectiveness in course and/or curriculum development.
  • Development or authorship of instructional material or a text that enhances the student learning process and has impact beyond the classroom.

Meet the Award Donor

Past Award Winners


The Robert G. Quinn Award

Robert G. Quinn was the archetype of that one teacher who made a difference in a student's life. As a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Drexel University, he had a gift and a passion for teaching. His colleagues and students described him as a "human hurricane," an outstanding educator, and a "professor's professor." He was an engaging, colorful, larger-than-life lecturer, who was equally at home solving Maxwell's equations or quoting Emily Dickinson, and who encouraged his students to learn on their own. His accomplishments in establishing a highly successful and innovative engineering curriculum at Drexel University are legendary. He was one of several people instrumental in the re-invention of U.S. engineering education.

Quinn served on the National Advisory Panel for the Space Shuttle, a consultant to NASA's manned space missions and an advisor to other government agencies, business and industry. His research at Drexel focused on undergraduate curriculum development, where he directed a major educational experiment funded by the National Science Foundation known as E4 or "An Enhanced Educational Experience for Engineers." This highly successful program evolved into the Drexel Engineering Curriculum, and many of its key features were emulated internationally in dozens of universities.

The Award: This award was established by Agilent Technologies, in proud memory of Robert G. Quinn and his contribution to thousands of engineering students and his direct influence on the Agilent Higher Education program. The award, which recognizes outstanding contributions in providing and promoting excellence in experimentation and laboratory instruction, consists of a $5,000 honorarium and an inscribed plaque.

Eligibility: Candidates must have demonstrated leadership in engineering or engineering technology education, developing a program that exhibits innovation, relevance to the real world, experiential learning and student motivation.

Qualifications: Award nominees must be faculty members of ASEE who have made outstanding, sustained contributions to the teaching of laboratory or experimentation courses in engineering or engineering technology and who:
1. Have motivated and inspired students toward excellence in their laboratory work.
2. Have also been innovators in the development of laboratory courses, course materials, facilities or equipment that have enriched students laboratory or experimentation experience.
3. Have encouraged a multi-disciplined, practical curricular approach, with the aim of developing the complete engineer.

Nomination: Follow the general nomination instructions. Members of the award selection committee are ineligible for nomination. The award can be received only once by any active or retired faculty member.

Past Award Winners


William Elgin Wickenden Award

This award is named in honor of William Elgin Wickenden, engineer, educator, philosopher, administrator and humanitarian. Throughout his distinguished career, he devoted himself to the personal and professional development of younger members of the engineering fraternity. His wisdom and leadership so infused the monumental "Report of the Investigation of Engineering Education, 1923-1929" that it has been popularly referred to as the Wickenden Report ever since. His publication, "The Second Mile," has been read by thousands of young engineers and has helped them form a sound conception of engineering as a career.

The Award: The award recognizes the author(s) of the best paper published in the Journal of Engineering Education, the scholarly research journal for the Society. The award consists of a commemorative plaque.

Qualifications: To be considered, a paper must have been a refereed article published in the Journal of Engineering Education during the previous volume year.  The selection is made by a committee composed of the journal's associate editors and four members of the journal's international advisory board, and chaired by the immediate past editor of the journal.

Nominations: All papers published are automatically considered. However, any ASEE member may also nominate a qualified paper for this award. A letter explaining the basis for the nomination is the only documentation required. Nominations should be forward to the editor of the Journal of Engineering Education.

Past Award Winners

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