PDFPDF

Revised 2017-10

Forward

Thank you for volunteering to be the ASEE Campus Representative for your institution! Much of ASEE's work is done by dedicated volunteers whose highest concern is to promote quality in engineering and engineering technology education. As the local, grass-root liaison for the Society, the importance of the services you provide to your campus and ASEE cannot be overemphasized. You are the direct link between your colleagues with questions, concerns, and comments about ASEE and the staff who can best respond. Your role is vital in getting information on membership opportunities and ASEE activities to potential members on your campus. The growth, stability, and effective operation of ASEE in accomplishing its mission of promoting excellence in engineering education directly depend upon you and the other Campus Representatives across our nation.

As in any volunteer office, the ability to carry out one's responsibilities is directly related to commitment and available time. We encourage you to dedicate yourself to this position, and actively participate in furthering ASEE's goals and beliefs. Although this office will require some of your valuable time, the rewards you will gain as a Campus Representative, both personal and professional, are significant.

This manual is written to help you maximize the usefulness of your time by providing a single source of useful information about the duties and activities of a Campus Representative. These duties include encouraging membership in ASEE, organizing educational activities on campus, coordinating the nomination process for ASEE awards, and serving as an information resource about ASEE meetings and resources.

Please treat this manual as a guide only. You are the best judge of what will work on your campus, so amplify and modify the guidelines to suit your needs. If you have questions about your duties or suggestions for improving this manual, please contact the Membership Department at ASEE Headquarters at (202) 331-3520 or membership@asee.org.

TOP

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO AS AN ASEE CAMPUS REPRESENTATIVE…

  • Let everyone on your campus know that you are their ASEE Campus Representative and will be happy to assist them in any dealings with the Society.
  • Work closely with your Dean to create a positive image of ASEE on your campus and publicize your Dean's support of ASEE.
  • Recruit new members and follow up to encourage renewal.
  • Publicize ASEE activities through your school's public relations office, campus newspapers, bulletin boards, e-mail announcements, etc.
  • Promote attendance at section and national ASEE meetings, and encourage innovative instructors to present their ideas at ASEE meetings.
  • Publicize ASEE's awards program and make nominations.
  • Promote active participation in ASEE's divisions and councils, both at the regional and national level.
  • Organize on-campus activities and simple get togethers to provide a forum for the faculty to exchange ideas and discuss pedagogical related issues. Such topics could include: new faculty orientation, TA development, tutoring workshop, teaching effectiveness committee/workshop, course/instructor evaluation and peer review, new technology delivery system, technical writing assistance, curriculum development, preparing scholarly publications, or a proposal writing workshop.

TOP

WHAT YOU MUST DO AS AN ASEE CAMPUS REPRESENTATIVE…

  • Complete an annual report to be submitted to ASEE headquarters. This online report must be submitted by December 1 each year. The report is located here.

TOP

HOW TO RECRUIT AND RETAIN MEMBERS

Selling points to use:

  • Society services: publications and communications; meetings and educational programs; sectional activities. These are the most frequently cited reasons for continuing membership.
  • Professional gain: enhancement of professional credibility with a corresponding increase in job opportunities, salary, and promotions. In addition, ASEE can provide networking opportunities with other individuals interested in engineering education.
  • Society's image: national leadership position and ability to represent member interests.
  • ASEE divisions: a special interest division for everyone (and probably three or four), each focusing on a different specialty or issue in engineering education.
  • Benefit to the profession.
  • Publishing opportunities: many forums in which to publish and present papers (including annual and section meetings, the Journal of Engineering Education, ASEE PRISM).
  • Fellowships: postdoctoral fellowships and summer faculty programs administered by ASEE.
  • Special Rates: discounted rates at the many ASEE sponsored conferences.

Who to contact:

  • Contact your Dean. His/her support and endorsement will prove invaluable.
  • Contact non-members. They may have never been invited to join. If your Dean participates in the Dean’s Program, encourage these non-members to join as part of the program.
  • Contact all new faculty in the engineering or engineering technology profession to encourage their active involvement in ASEE.
  • Use your institutional roster to contact lapsed members and encourage them to re-join.
  • Contact members identified on your institutional roster as having a ‘Grace’ membership status and encourage them to renew before their three-month grace period expires.
  • Meet with undergraduate and graduate students and brief them on the benefits of ASEE student membership. If there is an interest in starting a student chapter at your school, please contact ASEE's Membership Department for information and assistance.
  • Establish a working group of people interested in engineering and engineering technology education. Ideally, you might have a representative from each engineering department who can act as a point of contact for you.

TOP

WHAT ASEE'S HEADQUARTERS WILL PROVIDE FOR YOU…

  • Rosters that include active and lapsed ASEE members at your institution, as well as non-member faculty in the ASEE database.
  • A list of individuals from your institution attending and/or presenting at the upcoming annual conference.
  • Copies of the quarterly membership report to the Board. Periodic membership status updates throughout the year.
  • Membership applications, comprehensive ASEE brochures, and division information. Annual Conference information and schedules for section meetings.
  • ASEE Student Chapter information.
  • Extra copies of the Awards Nomination Booklet that is mailed to all members each year with the November issue of ASEE PRISM.
  • Recent copies of ASEE PRISM.
  • Recent copies of The Journal of Engineering Education.
  • A list of Society officers, including Program Chairs so that you can ask questions relating to paper requirements.
  • The opportunity to borrow a table-top display and/or vinyl banner to use at local meeting.


To receive any of these materials, contact ASEE's Membership Department by phone at (202) 331-3520, by fax at (202) 265-8504 or by e-mail to membership@asee.org.

You can also get most of these resources online whenever you need them. Just log in to the ASEE web site and go to the Campus Representative Toolbox.

TOP

THE OUTSTANDING CAMPUS REPRESENTATIVE REPORT

This report documents the ASEE activities at your campus. Your Section Campus Representative uses this report to select the Outstanding Campus Representative for the Section.

To honor individuals who have achieved excellence in their roles as active supporters of ASEE, the Outstanding Campus Representative Awards and Outstanding Zone Campus Representative Awards were created. These awards recognize the outstanding Campus Representatives for each of the twelve Sections, and ultimately for each of the four geographic Zones. The Section Campus Representative chooses the Outstanding Campus Representative from his or her Section based upon the activities reported in the Outstanding Campus Representative report. This online report is opened each October is located in the Campus Rep Toolbox. When submitting the online report copies will automatically be sent to your dean/head of engineering, ASEE headquarters and your Section Campus Rep or Section Chair if your section does not have a Section Campus Rep. The report remains open through mid-January.

The Outstanding Section Campus Representative Award is presented at the Annual Section meetings. The appropriate Zone Chair then selects the Outstanding Zone Campus Representative Award winners from these Section winners. The criteria for both awards include the following:

  • Improvement of engineering education through excellence in on-campus programming of ASEE activities.
  • Promotion of individual membership in the Society.
  • Encouragement of faculty attendance at National, Division, and Section meetings.

The Outstanding Zone Campus Representative Award is presented at the Awards Banquet at the ASEE Annual Conference along with the Society’s other national awards.

TOP

ASEE AWARDS PROGRAM

Outstanding teaching and research activities on your campus should be recognized. You are encouraged to submit nominations for educators worthy of an ASEE award. Criteria for ASEE awards are published in the Awards Nomination Booklet.

The following are suggestions for increasing the effectiveness of your awards program.

  • Increase the awareness of your faculty by prominently advertising the ASEE awards program.
  • Volunteer to chair or serve on your institution's awards committee. If there is no awards committee, offer to create one. Faculty deserve recognition for their excellent work.
  • The dean of your engineering college and the department chairs should be personally reminded of this awards program well before the deadline for nominations.

TOP

ASEE'S VISION AND HISTORY

As the primary liaison for the Society at the grass roots level, familiarity with the Society's history, structure, vision, and mission will enhance your effectiveness as ASEE Campus Representative. You should also become familiar with the Society publications, ASEE PRISM and the Journal of Engineering Education, as well as brochures, booklets, manuals and other published materials.

The American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) began in 1893 as the Society for the Promotion of Engineering Education (SPEE) and was incorporated, using this name, in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania on January 29, 1943. As of that day, the Society had $13,500 cash and no real property assets. The name was changed to the American Society for Engineering Education in June 1946, at the Annual Conference hosted by Washington University in St. Louis.

The official vision of the American Society for Engineering Education is as follows:

The American Society for Engineering Education will serve as the premier multidisciplinary society for individuals and organizations committed to advancing excellence in all aspects of engineering and engineering technology education.

To realize its Vision, ASEE will:

  • Enhance services to its members
  • Work with educational institutions and industry to improve engineering education and promote faculty development
  • Facilitate productive collaborations among industry, academe, and government Increase the participation and success of underrepresented groups in the engineering profession
  • Promote the value of the engineering profession to society
  • Increase membership in ASEE in order to more completely serve the engineering and engineering technology enterprise
  • Facilitate international cooperation in matters pertaining to engineering education.

The Society seeks to encourage local, national and international communication and collaboration; influence corporate and government policies and involvement; promote professional interaction and lifelong learning; recognize outstanding contributions of individuals and organizations; encourage youth to pursue studies and careers in engineering and engineering technology; promote diversity in the profession by supporting educational opportunity for underrepresented groups; and enhance recruitment, retention, and professional development of engineering faculty.

TOP

SOCIETY ORGANIZATION

The overall activity of the Society is carried out through a system of thirteen councils. There are three types of councils: institutional, professional interest, and geographic Sections. The thirteen Council Chairs sit on the Board of Directors, thereby directly representing the interests of all Councils and all institutional, corporate, and individual members.

The ASEE Board of Directors is the governing, policy-making and legally responsible body which oversees and coordinates all Society activities. It is composed of the President, President-elect, Immediate Past President, Vice President of Finance, the Chairs of the thirteen Society Councils, the Vice President for External Relations, Vice President of Member Affairs and Executive Director.

The President-elect, Vice President of Finance, Vice President for External Relations, Vice President of Member Affairs, and the Chairs of the four Professional Interest Councils are elected by the individual membership of the Society. The President-elect automatically succeeds to the office of President, then Past-President. The Executive Director is appointed by the Board. You will find the names and contact information for current Board members on the ASEE web site.

ASEE members in the United States and Canada are divided geographically among twelve Sections. These Sections are grouped into four Zones. A map showing the Section and Zone boundaries, as well as a listing of current Section officers and upcoming Section meetings can be found on the ASEE web site.

Activities of the three Sections within each Zone are coordinated through the Zone Executive Board, under the leadership of the Zone Chair. The Zone Executive Board consists of the Zone Chair, the Chair-Elect or Immediate Past Chair as appropriate, and the Section Chair, Chair-Elect and Section Campus Representative of each Section. Each Section is governed by a set of by- laws, which are updated periodically by the Section leadership. The four Zones are also governed by a set of by-laws which cover Zone Executive Board composition, meetings, etc. These are also useful documents for Campus Representatives. You can find them all, and additional information about the Society's structure and activities on the ASEE web site.

TOP

 

PDFPDF

Revised 2017-10

Forward

Thank you for volunteering to be the ASEE Campus Representative for your institution! Much of ASEE's work is done by dedicated volunteers whose highest concern is to promote quality in engineering and engineering technology education. As the local, grass-root liaison for the Society, the importance of the services you provide to your campus and ASEE cannot be overemphasized. You are the direct link between your colleagues with questions, concerns, and comments about ASEE and the staff who can best respond. Your role is vital in getting information on membership opportunities and ASEE activities to potential members on your campus. The growth, stability, and effective operation of ASEE in accomplishing its mission of promoting excellence in engineering education directly depend upon you and the other Campus Representatives across our nation.

As in any volunteer office, the ability to carry out one's responsibilities is directly related to commitment and available time. We encourage you to dedicate yourself to this position, and actively participate in furthering ASEE's goals and beliefs. Although this office will require some of your valuable time, the rewards you will gain as a Campus Representative, both personal and professional, are significant.

This manual is written to help you maximize the usefulness of your time by providing a single source of useful information about the duties and activities of a Campus Representative. These duties include encouraging membership in ASEE, organizing educational activities on campus, coordinating the nomination process for ASEE awards, and serving as an information resource about ASEE meetings and resources.

Please treat this manual as a guide only. You are the best judge of what will work on your campus, so amplify and modify the guidelines to suit your needs. If you have questions about your duties or suggestions for improving this manual, please contact the Membership Department at ASEE Headquarters at (202) 331-3520 or membership@asee.org.

TOP

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO AS AN ASEE CAMPUS REPRESENTATIVE…

  • Let everyone on your campus know that you are their ASEE Campus Representative and will be happy to assist them in any dealings with the Society.
  • Work closely with your Dean to create a positive image of ASEE on your campus and publicize your Dean's support of ASEE.
  • Recruit new members and follow up to encourage renewal.
  • Publicize ASEE activities through your school's public relations office, campus newspapers, bulletin boards, e-mail announcements, etc.
  • Promote attendance at section and national ASEE meetings, and encourage innovative instructors to present their ideas at ASEE meetings.
  • Publicize ASEE's awards program and make nominations.
  • Promote active participation in ASEE's divisions and councils, both at the regional and national level.
  • Organize on-campus activities and simple get togethers to provide a forum for the faculty to exchange ideas and discuss pedagogical related issues. Such topics could include: new faculty orientation, TA development, tutoring workshop, teaching effectiveness committee/workshop, course/instructor evaluation and peer review, new technology delivery system, technical writing assistance, curriculum development, preparing scholarly publications, or a proposal writing workshop.

TOP

WHAT YOU MUST DO AS AN ASEE CAMPUS REPRESENTATIVE…

  • Complete an annual report to be submitted to ASEE headquarters. This online report must be submitted by December 1 each year. The report is located here.

TOP

HOW TO RECRUIT AND RETAIN MEMBERS

Selling points to use:

  • Society services: publications and communications; meetings and educational programs; sectional activities. These are the most frequently cited reasons for continuing membership.
  • Professional gain: enhancement of professional credibility with a corresponding increase in job opportunities, salary, and promotions. In addition, ASEE can provide networking opportunities with other individuals interested in engineering education.
  • Society's image: national leadership position and ability to represent member interests.
  • ASEE divisions: a special interest division for everyone (and probably three or four), each focusing on a different specialty or issue in engineering education.
  • Benefit to the profession.
  • Publishing opportunities: many forums in which to publish and present papers (including annual and section meetings, the Journal of Engineering Education, ASEE PRISM).
  • Fellowships: postdoctoral fellowships and summer faculty programs administered by ASEE.
  • Special Rates: discounted rates at the many ASEE sponsored conferences.

Who to contact:

  • Contact your Dean. His/her support and endorsement will prove invaluable.
  • Contact non-members. They may have never been invited to join. If your Dean participates in the Dean’s Program, encourage these non-members to join as part of the program.
  • Contact all new faculty in the engineering or engineering technology profession to encourage their active involvement in ASEE.
  • Use your institutional roster to contact lapsed members and encourage them to re-join.
  • Contact members identified on your institutional roster as having a ‘Grace’ membership status and encourage them to renew before their three-month grace period expires.
  • Meet with undergraduate and graduate students and brief them on the benefits of ASEE student membership. If there is an interest in starting a student chapter at your school, please contact ASEE's Membership Department for information and assistance.
  • Establish a working group of people interested in engineering and engineering technology education. Ideally, you might have a representative from each engineering department who can act as a point of contact for you.

TOP

WHAT ASEE'S HEADQUARTERS WILL PROVIDE FOR YOU…

  • Rosters that include active and lapsed ASEE members at your institution, as well as non-member faculty in the ASEE database.
  • A list of individuals from your institution attending and/or presenting at the upcoming annual conference.
  • Copies of the quarterly membership report to the Board. Periodic membership status updates throughout the year.
  • Membership applications, comprehensive ASEE brochures, and division information. Annual Conference information and schedules for section meetings.
  • ASEE Student Chapter information.
  • Extra copies of the Awards Nomination Booklet that is mailed to all members each year with the November issue of ASEE PRISM.
  • Recent copies of ASEE PRISM.
  • Recent copies of The Journal of Engineering Education.
  • A list of Society officers, including Program Chairs so that you can ask questions relating to paper requirements.
  • The opportunity to borrow a table-top display and/or vinyl banner to use at local meeting.


To receive any of these materials, contact ASEE's Membership Department by phone at (202) 331-3520, by fax at (202) 265-8504 or by e-mail to membership@asee.org.

You can also get most of these resources online whenever you need them. Just log in to the ASEE web site and go to the Campus Representative Toolbox.

TOP

THE OUTSTANDING CAMPUS REPRESENTATIVE REPORT

This report documents the ASEE activities at your campus. Your Section Campus Representative uses this report to select the Outstanding Campus Representative for the Section.

To honor individuals who have achieved excellence in their roles as active supporters of ASEE, the Outstanding Campus Representative Awards and Outstanding Zone Campus Representative Awards were created. These awards recognize the outstanding Campus Representatives for each of the twelve Sections, and ultimately for each of the four geographic Zones. The Section Campus Representative chooses the Outstanding Campus Representative from his or her Section based upon the activities reported in the Outstanding Campus Representative report. This online report is opened each October is located in the Campus Rep Toolbox. When submitting the online report copies will automatically be sent to your dean/head of engineering, ASEE headquarters and your Section Campus Rep or Section Chair if your section does not have a Section Campus Rep. The report remains open through mid-January.

The Outstanding Section Campus Representative Award is presented at the Annual Section meetings. The appropriate Zone Chair then selects the Outstanding Zone Campus Representative Award winners from these Section winners. The criteria for both awards include the following:

  • Improvement of engineering education through excellence in on-campus programming of ASEE activities.
  • Promotion of individual membership in the Society.
  • Encouragement of faculty attendance at National, Division, and Section meetings.

The Outstanding Zone Campus Representative Award is presented at the Awards Banquet at the ASEE Annual Conference along with the Society’s other national awards.

TOP

ASEE AWARDS PROGRAM

Outstanding teaching and research activities on your campus should be recognized. You are encouraged to submit nominations for educators worthy of an ASEE award. Criteria for ASEE awards are published in the Awards Nomination Booklet.

The following are suggestions for increasing the effectiveness of your awards program.

  • Increase the awareness of your faculty by prominently advertising the ASEE awards program.
  • Volunteer to chair or serve on your institution's awards committee. If there is no awards committee, offer to create one. Faculty deserve recognition for their excellent work.
  • The dean of your engineering college and the department chairs should be personally reminded of this awards program well before the deadline for nominations.

TOP

ASEE'S VISION AND HISTORY

As the primary liaison for the Society at the grass roots level, familiarity with the Society's history, structure, vision, and mission will enhance your effectiveness as ASEE Campus Representative. You should also become familiar with the Society publications, ASEE PRISM and the Journal of Engineering Education, as well as brochures, booklets, manuals and other published materials.

The American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) began in 1893 as the Society for the Promotion of Engineering Education (SPEE) and was incorporated, using this name, in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania on January 29, 1943. As of that day, the Society had $13,500 cash and no real property assets. The name was changed to the American Society for Engineering Education in June 1946, at the Annual Conference hosted by Washington University in St. Louis.

The official vision of the American Society for Engineering Education is as follows:

The American Society for Engineering Education will serve as the premier multidisciplinary society for individuals and organizations committed to advancing excellence in all aspects of engineering and engineering technology education.

To realize its Vision, ASEE will:

  • Enhance services to its members
  • Work with educational institutions and industry to improve engineering education and promote faculty development
  • Facilitate productive collaborations among industry, academe, and government Increase the participation and success of underrepresented groups in the engineering profession
  • Promote the value of the engineering profession to society
  • Increase membership in ASEE in order to more completely serve the engineering and engineering technology enterprise
  • Facilitate international cooperation in matters pertaining to engineering education.

The Society seeks to encourage local, national and international communication and collaboration; influence corporate and government policies and involvement; promote professional interaction and lifelong learning; recognize outstanding contributions of individuals and organizations; encourage youth to pursue studies and careers in engineering and engineering technology; promote diversity in the profession by supporting educational opportunity for underrepresented groups; and enhance recruitment, retention, and professional development of engineering faculty.

TOP

SOCIETY ORGANIZATION

The overall activity of the Society is carried out through a system of thirteen councils. There are three types of councils: institutional, professional interest, and geographic Sections. The thirteen Council Chairs sit on the Board of Directors, thereby directly representing the interests of all Councils and all institutional, corporate, and individual members.

The ASEE Board of Directors is the governing, policy-making and legally responsible body which oversees and coordinates all Society activities. It is composed of the President, President-elect, Immediate Past President, Vice President of Finance, the Chairs of the thirteen Society Councils, the Vice President for External Relations, Vice President of Member Affairs and Executive Director.

The President-elect, Vice President of Finance, Vice President for External Relations, Vice President of Member Affairs, and the Chairs of the four Professional Interest Councils are elected by the individual membership of the Society. The President-elect automatically succeeds to the office of President, then Past-President. The Executive Director is appointed by the Board. You will find the names and contact information for current Board members on the ASEE web site.

ASEE members in the United States and Canada are divided geographically among twelve Sections. These Sections are grouped into four Zones. A map showing the Section and Zone boundaries, as well as a listing of current Section officers and upcoming Section meetings can be found on the ASEE web site.

Activities of the three Sections within each Zone are coordinated through the Zone Executive Board, under the leadership of the Zone Chair. The Zone Executive Board consists of the Zone Chair, the Chair-Elect or Immediate Past Chair as appropriate, and the Section Chair, Chair-Elect and Section Campus Representative of each Section. Each Section is governed by a set of by- laws, which are updated periodically by the Section leadership. The four Zones are also governed by a set of by-laws which cover Zone Executive Board composition, meetings, etc. These are also useful documents for Campus Representatives. You can find them all, and additional information about the Society's structure and activities on the ASEE web site.

TOP