Join the American Society for Engineering Education in
Seattle, Washington for the 122nd Annual Conference & Exposition
Making Value for Society
June 14 – 17, 2015

The ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition is the only conference dedicated to all disciplines of engineering and engineering technology education. As the premier event of its kind, the ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition fosters an exchange of ideas, enhances teaching methods and curricula, and provides unparalleled networking opportunities for engineering and technology education stakeholders including deans, faculty members, researchers, and industry and government professionals.

The conference features more than 400 technical sessions, with peer-reviewed papers spanning all disciplines of engineering education; distinguished lectures including the main plenary; award receptions and banquets; the “Greet the Stars” orientation for new ASEE members and first-time conference attendees; and the ASEE Division Mixer. The Exhibit Hall is also home to several exciting events, including the “Focus on Exhibits” Welcome Reception, Brunch, Summertime Social and Luncheon. We look forward to welcoming you to Seattle!

2015 Highlights

M204 - Main Plenary I

Date: Monday, June 15, 2015
Location: Washington State Convention Center
Time: 8:45 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Keynote Speaker: Maria Klawe

Maria Klawe - President of Harvey Mudd CollegeHarvey Mudd College is led by Maria Klawe, the College’s fifth president, who began her tenure in 2006. A renowned mathematician, computer scientist and scholar, President Klawe is the first woman to lead the College since its founding in 1955. Prior to joining Harvey Mudd, she served as dean of engineering and professor of computer science at Princeton University. During her time at Princeton, Klawe led the School of Engineering and Applied Science through a strategic planning exercise that created an exciting and widely embraced vision for the school. At Harvey Mudd College, she led a similarly ambitious strategic planning initiative, “HMC 2020: Envisioning the Future.”

 

Kai KightFeaturing:

Kai Kight, a former engineering student and a product of Stanford University's Innovation Mecca, the Design School, combines beautiful violin music with insights on engineering and design. “Innovation happens at intersections,” he notes, citing his efforts to combine classical music with hip hop. His presentations ask the question: “Are you writing new music, or are you just playing notes that have been written for you?”

This session will also feature the 2015 President’s Award Recipient:

For Inspiration and Recognition in Science and Technology (FIRST) Accepted by FIRST Executive Advisory Board member

Woodie C FlowersDr. Woodie Flowers
Pappalardo Professor Emeritus
Mechanical Engineering
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

 

 

 

And National High School STEM Winners

Intel Science Fair
Student:
Kalia Firester, Hunter College High School, New York, NY – 2015

Kalia Firester, 18, is a senior at Hunter College High School in New York City. She is the 2015 Intel Science Talent Search Second Place winner in the category of Global Good, and a Second Award Winner at the 2013 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair for her work in engineering crop plants to defend against parasitic nematodes on their own, obviating the need for chemical pesticides. Her method involved identifying how a protein produced by parasitic nematodes disrupted plant defenses and enabled parasitic development. By genetically engineering plants to express or degrade this protein, she found that the protein was essential for sustaining the parasite in the plant. But plants she engineered to eliminate that protein, halted nematode development. This work was done at the Agricultural Research Organization in Israel. Firester also was the 2011 and 2012 national winner of the American Museum of Natural History's Young Naturalist Awards for her discovery of an innovative natural insecticide, and her biological water filtration system purifying gray water utilizing a novel water plant. Those projects were done in Firester's kitchen. Most recently, Kalia interned at the Lab of Molecular Parasitology and Lymphocyte Biology at Rockefeller University where she studied African trypanosomes. At Hunter, she is a teaching intern in research biology. Aside from science, Firester earned a visual and digital arts certificate from Parsons The New School for Design's Pre-College Academy. She is a member of Young Playwrights, Inc. and a recipient of numerous Scholastic Art & Writing Awards in visual arts and writing. To her art pursuits, she credits the creative methodology that assists in finding scientific solutions. In college, she plans to major in molecular biology and visual arts.

Engineering Programs in Community Service (EPICS), Purdue University
Student:
Teresa Dinh, Sammamish High School, Bellevue, WA – 2016

I am a junior at Sammamish High School (Bellevue, WA) planning to attend college after graduation. I have a strong interest in pursuing a career in engineering that was fueled by my experience at SHS. I was first introduced to engineering during my sophomore year when took my first engineering class at SHS. Before that, I didn't know much about engineering or what real-world engineers do, I just thought that “engineers engineer stuff”.

During my first engineering class, I began developing my design skills and problem solving skills, and started to get an idea of what engineering encompasses. I feel like this year (my junior year) there has been a big jump in my engineering skill development and my interest in engineering. This is a result of the work I completed on my EPIC project, modifying 12V motorized cars for handicapped students. The project challenged me and helped me grow in many ways. As example, before the project, I had never used CAD. Through this project, I learned how to use CAD and print parts on a 3D printer. I brainstormed and created prototypes for my 3D button leading to the final design solution. This process really helped me expand my problem solving skills, as when one design failed, I analyzed the problem to improve the design ending with a final design that met the requirements of the project. It took a lot of patience to fail multiple times and not always feel like I was making forward progress; however, I stayed motivated and was able to find the right solution. This experience taught me the nature of engineering. Engineers are destined to fail at some point in the design process. Failure is crucial to finding the optimal solution. This understanding that failure is necessary for success will help me overcome failures in the future.

My EPICS project also helped develop my interest in engineering, as I really enjoyed helping my stakeholder solve their problems, and I realized that engineering really is all about helping people! I have signed up again next year for another engineering class, with the goal of completing another project for new stakeholder and continue building my skills and interest in engineering.

Engineering Programs in Community Service (EPICS), Purdue University
Student:
Nick DeGallier, Sammamish High School, Bellevue, WA – 2015

I am a senior at Sammamish High School and will be graduating this spring. Next year I plan to attend Claremont McKenna College where I will major in Economics and play baseball.

I chose to take engineering classes in high school because I was interested in engineering and wanted to improve my problem solving skills. At the end of my junior year our class constructed an 18 foot cardboard bridge that held 3118 pounds. In the building process I was the leader of the group tasked with building and designing the 18 foot horizontal beams, the foundation of the bridge. This experience was thrilling and I became hooked on the design process.

My engineering experience during senior year has been even better. I have modified 12 volt cars for physically handicapped children. Along the way I have learned a variety of useful trades like 3D printing, wiring, and craftsmanship. This project has been extremely fulfilling and exciting because its impact expands beyond the walls of my high school. Benefiting children is one of my passions, and my project helps alleviate physical barriers that hinders the cognitive development of physically handicapped children.

The EPICS program at my high school has allowed me to experience the stimulation of serving others with problem solving expertise. As a result I have set my sights on a career of service. My ideal career is one where I can use economic and financial expertise to solve real world problems. One example includes working at non-profits like the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to collaborate on matters like education, and poverty and working for a government agency like the Office of Budget and Management to help close the widening inequality of wealth in America.

First Robotics Competition
Student:
Parker Owen, for the last year Parker has been developing a business that has a unique way of delivering on campus advertising for third party entities. He is not currently enrolled in an education institution.

Parker Owen is an entrepreneur, inventor and Founder/CEO of Frapz Advertising LLC. Born and raised in Birmingham, Alabama, Parker grew up in an entrepreneurial household — his father owned a successful sign company specializing in branded vehicle wraps, while his grandmother owned one of the state's very first storage unit companies.

A marketing visionary, Parker developed a unique way to merge both of these worlds and formed Frapz Advertising LLC — a groundbreaking approach to monetizing the empty physical space of everyday electronics with sleek vinyl advertising. The new enterprise connects businesses with their target customers in the concentrated urban areas in which they live, work and play. By leasing the back “real-estate” of personal electronic devices such as phones, laptops, ext.., businesses can capitalize on this previously vacant space by advertising their business in a very understated way.

Parker attributes much of his success to his participation in FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology), an afterschool program that shows students of every age that science, technology and problem-solving are not only fun and rewarding, but are proven paths to successful careers. Parker is living proof of that and his passion for the program continues to motivate him to remain active in the FIRST program whenever he can.

“For the many problems in the work, FIRST is a solution that empowers and equips the next generation to do more and go farther than ever thought possible” says Parker. His experience with FIRST and his own recent success has inspired him to create a STEM based program that would serve as a resource to up-and-coming entrepreneurs and inventors. Through collaboration with several education organizations, Parker hopes this initiative will help others connect and network with the right people in order to bring their businesses and products to market.

Parker hold patents pending for Frapz as well for the world-famous Cycle-Leg–a low cost prosthetic leg made from the single bicycle. At 17, Parker's brainchild will revolutionize the prosthetic industry by affording greater global access to those in need. The Cycle-Leg was awarded the FIRST Future Innovators Award which garnered worldwide attention and recognition for Parker and earned him an invitation to the 2014 White House Science Expo as well as an audience with President Obama.

Features in national publications such as “Wired” magazine, the “Birmingham News” and online newsfeeds like AOL.com and A1.com soon followed as well as interview with the CEO of Time Warner Cable, Bill Nye, “The Science Guy” and Kari Byron from the TV show “MythBusters”.

Because of the life changing advice Parker received from his mentor and FIRST Founder Dean Kamen, he is especially passionate about his new initiatives. “I remember asking Dean, ‘How do I go from being a kid from Alabama to being you?’ Dean gave me one of the three most important pieces of advice I had ever received”, he continued, “He told me ‘You're not going to do it alone–it takes people, so partner with the right people’.”

Parker continues to follow that advice to this day.

Conrad Spirit of Innovation Challenge
Student:
Savannah Cofer, Columbus Academy, Columbus, OH – 2015

Savannah Cofer is a senior at Columbus Academy in Columbus, Ohio. For the past 8 years, she has won numerous awards at international robotics tournaments as part of the FIRST organization. Savannah is passionate about developing innovations that can address real world problems. Her innovations include self-cleaning grocery conveyor belts, earthquake resistant housing for the third world, a system to protect bicyclists & soldiers, and a device to reduce essential hand tremors. Savannah is a two time winner of the Conrad Spirit of Innovation Awards, Moonbots Google Lunar X-Prize, and the Christopher Columbus Awards.

Conrad Spirit of Innovation Challenge
Student:
Varun Vallabhaneni, Columbus Academy, Columbus, OH – 2015

Varun Vallabhaneni is a senior at Columbus Academy and has a passion for STEM related activities. Since lower school, he has had the opportunity to compete in national and international STEM competitions ranging from First Lego League Robotics to scientific research and entrepreneurial competitions. His favorite subjects in school are science and history, but he has a particular inclination towards the field of biology. When not building robots, doing research, or studying, he loves to watch Netflix, play tennis, or spend time with my friends/family! Varun is a two time winner of the Conrad Spirit of Innovation Awards, Moonbots Google Lunar X-Prize, and the Christopher Columbus Awards.

By Kids for Kids
Student:
Hana Bidon, Engineering and Science University Magnet School, Hamden, CT– 2016

Hana Bidon is a junior at the Engineering and Science University Magnet School (ESUMS) in Hamden, CT. In school, she participates in Science Olympiad as well as the Math club and the high school band. Outside of school, she participates in Peabody Evolutions (after school program) in addition to the Greater Bridgeport Youth Orchestras (GBYO) as a violinist. This year, she has won the Sikorsky Helicopter 2050 challenge with her helicopter design, Skylift 968. Unlike existing helicopters, this helicopter is made out of recycled fiber - composite material, which uses 3d vascular networks to self-heal. As a result, this helicopter can automatically repair cracks with the aid of a technician.

T357 - Main Plenary II

Date: Tuesday, June 16, 2015
Location: Washington State Convention Center
Time: 10:30 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Best Paper Award Recognition and Corporate Member Council Industry Day Keynote Speaker.

Most Outstanding Teaching Award:

Robert M. Brooks

Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Temple University

2014 Best Overall Zone Paper:

Title: Investigating & Visualizing Measurement Error for Novice “STEM” Learners

Author: Scott A. Sinex, Prince George's Community College, Largo, MD

2014 Best Overall Conference Paper:

Title: Perspectives on Failure in the Classroom by Elementary Teachers New to Teaching Engineering

Author: Pamela Lottero-Perdue, Towson University

Co-Authors: Elizabeth A. Parry, North Carolina State University

Keynote Speaker:

Dr John J Tracy - CTO The Boeing CompanyDr. John J. Tracy is chief technology officer of The Boeing Company and senior vice president of Engineering, Operations & Technology. He reports to Boeing Chairman, President and CEO Jim McNerney.

In addition to serving on the company's Executive Council, he oversees the development and implementation of the enterprise technology investment strategy and provides strategic direction to several functions and business organizations comprising more than 100,000 employees. These include the Engineering, Operations, and Supplier Management functions, and also the Information Technology, Test & Evaluation, Enterprise Technology Strategy, Intellectual Property Management, Research & Technology, and Environment, Health and Safety organizations.

Previously Tracy was vice president of Engineering & Mission Assurance for Boeing Integrated Defense Systems. Tracy had functional management responsibility for the IDS engineering processes, engineering tools, and the 32,000-person engineering team. Prior to this assignment, Tracy was vice president of Structural Technologies, Prototyping, and Quality for the Boeing Phantom Works advanced R&D unit, where he was responsible for advanced materials and processes, structural design and analysis, manufacturing technology, prototype development, and the Phantom Works Quality function.

Tracy has also served as the general manager of Engineering for Boeing Military Aircraft and Missiles in Southern California, the director of the Space and Communications Advanced Engineering organization, the director of Operations Management, and director of Structures Technology for Southern California Phantom Works. He joined McDonnell Douglas as a stress analyst in Huntington Beach in 1981, after serving as a high school science teacher in Los Angeles.

Tracy is a Member of the National Academy of Engineering and is a Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the Royal Aeronautical Society. He is also a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and the past chair of the ASME 6,000-member Aerospace Division.

Tracy has authored more than 30 publications in the areas of composite structural mechanics, launch vehicle structures, smart structures, and aging aircraft. He currently serves on the Board of Trustees for the Illinois Institute of Technology and on the engineering advisory board for several leading universities.

Tracy received a PhD in Engineering (1987) from the University of California-Irvine, and a master's degree and a bachelor's degree in Physics respectively from California State University-Los Angeles (1981) and California State University-Dominguez Hills (1976).

He is married to Katherine Katsumata Tracy, and they have two grown children: Scott Tracy and Wendy MacGinnis

T664 - Best Zone Paper Competition

Best Zone Papers: I-IV
Technical - Council of Sections
Date: Tuesday, June 16, 2015
Location: Washington State Convention Center
Time: 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM.

Zone I

Title: A Deeper Understanding of Technology is Needed for Workforce Readiness – Playing Games, Texting, and Tweets Aren't Enough to Make Students Tech-Savvy
Authors: Best We Can Be, Inc. - Teresa Piliouras, AITE High School - Raymond Yu, Kristin Villanueva, Yingxin Chen, Holly Robillard, Michael Berson, Jeanne Lauer, Garret Sampel, Daniel Lapinski, Maigh Attre

Zone II

Title: The Da Vinci Foundry: A Powerful Learning and Thinking System to Develop the 21st Century Renaissance Engineer
Authors: P. E. Arce,Tennessee Technological University, J. Biernacki, Tennessee Technological University, J. Pascal, Tennessee Technological University, J. R. Sanders, Tennessee Technological University

Zone III

Title: Correlating Engineering Statics Student Performance with Scores of a Test over Pre-requisite Material Involving Problem Solving
Authors: Roy Myose, Wichita State University, Syed Raza, Wichita State University, Wichita State University, Klaus Hoffmann, Wichita State University, Armin Ghoddoussi, Wichita State University

Zone IV

Title: HSI STEM: Research Opportunities to Improve Retention and Increase the Pipeline to Graduate School
Authors: Gino Galvez, California State University, Long Beach, Eric Marinez, California State University, Long Beach, Alvaro Monge, California State University, Long Beach

 

Distinguished Lectures - Wednesday, June 17 - Sponsored By WebsEdge

Date: Wednesday, June 17, 2015
Location: Washington State Convention Center
Time: 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

W314A - DISTINGUISHED LECTURE: “Power to the People: Engineering Education and Energy Poverty Alleviation”: Presented by Professor Henry Louie & “A Framework for Catalyzing Change in Engineering Education”, Presented by Susan Elrod

Power to the People: Engineering Education and Energy Poverty Alleviation
Prof. Henry Louie - Seattle University

Dr. Henry Louie received his B.S.E.E. from Kettering University, his M.S. from the University of Illinois and his PhD from the University of Washington in 2008. He is an Associate Professor at Seattle University in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Dr. Louie serves on the Governing Board of the IEEE Power & Energy Society (PES), is the founding Secretary of the IEEE PES Working Group on Sustainable Energy Systems for Developing Countries and was Technical Program Co-Chair of the 2012 IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference. He has led energy development projects over several years in Zambia and Kenya and is a member of the IEEE PES Community Solutions Initiative, which seeks to use renewable energy and technology to improve lives of people in remote communities in a sustainable way. He is the recipient of the 2013 IEEE Region 6 Northwest Area Outstanding Educator award. Dr. Louie is a Senior Member of the IEEE and in 2014 was named a Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE for this talks related to energy poverty.

A Framework for Catalyzing Change in Engineering Education
Susan Elrod - Chico State University

Susan Elrod serves as the Interim Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs at California State University, Chico. She arrived in Chico in October 2014, after serving as Dean of the College of Science and Mathematics at California State University Fresno, where she led initiatives at the university, state and national levels that focused on improving student success and faculty development in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) disciplines, while enhancing support for research and expanding community and industry engagement. Prior to her work at Fresno, Elrod served as Executive Director of Project Kaleidoscope (PKAL) at the Association of American Colleges & Universities in Washington, DC. During her tenure at PKAL, she launched several multi-campus, national STEM education initiatives focused on interdisciplinary learning, sustainability, and STEM student transfer success. She also expanded PKAL's national program of regional faculty development networks and enhanced PKAL's Summer Leadership Institute for emerging faculty leaders in the STEM disciplines. She continues to serves as a senior scholar at AAC&U and as an advisor and research investigator on several national projects. Elrod holds a Ph.D. in Genetics from the University of California, Davis and a B.S. in Biological Science from California State University, Chico.

W333 - DISTINGUISHED LECTURE: To and Through: Creating an Ecosystem of Achievement for College Success

Karl Reid - National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE)

Karl Reid is the newly appointed Executive Director of the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE), a 30,000 plus membership organization in Alexandria, Virginia whose mission is to increase the number of culturally responsible black engineers who excel academically, succeed professionally and positively impact the community.

For more than 15 years, Dr. Reid has been a leading advocate for increasing college access and opportunity for low income and minority youth. Dr. Reid comes to NSBE from the United Negro College Fund where he served as senior vice president of research, innovation and member college engagement. He oversaw new program development, research and capacity building for the organization’s 37 historically black colleges and universities.

Prior to joining UNCF, Dr. Reid was Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education and Director of the Office of Minority Education at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he was responsible for the academic performance and leadership development of underrepresented minority students. He also served as Assistant to the MIT Chancellor for Student Diversity. Earlier in his career, Dr. Reid served for eight years as executive director of Engineering Outreach Programs for MIT's School of Engineering where he directed local and national college access programs that aimed to increase the number of students from underserved and underrepresented communities prepared to study science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

He also lectured on race, identity and academic achievement and served on MIT's Committee on Undergraduate Engineering Practice, the Committee on Campus Race Relations and the Presidential Task Force on Minority Student Achievement. Born and raised in New York City and Long Island, New York, Dr. Reid earned both his Bachelors and Masters of Science degrees in Materials Science and Engineering from MIT, and his Doctorate of Education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education. His research interests include exploring the relationships between racial identity and self-efficacy, and their influence on the academic achievement of African American males in higher education.

After graduating from MIT, Dr. Reid worked for 12 years in the computer industry in product management, marketing, sales and consulting for several companies including IBM where he won several regional and branch awards. Dr. Reid is a member of the Tau Beta Pi National Engineering Honor Society. Among other activities, he directs Christian education at the Reid Temple AME Church and blogs about academic achievement and success strategies.

Dr. Reid is a recipient of the NSBE Golden Torch Award for “Minority Engineering Program Director of the Year” and the Outstanding Advisor of the Year award from the MIT Academic Resource Center. He is also a recipient of the YMCA Black Achievers Award, the MIT Presidential Award for Community Service and the MIT Excellence Award for his outreach efforts. He and his wife Andrea live in Silver Spring, Maryland and have three children.

W351 - DISTINGUISHED LECTURE: National Academies Report on Career Choices of Women Engineers

Dr. Alice Merner Agogino - University of California, Berkeley

Professor Alice M. Agogino is Roscoe and Elizabeth Hughes Professor of Mechanical Engineering at University of California, Berkeley.

 

 

 

W357A - 2014 Best PIC & Best Zone Paper Presentations
Dist. Lecture: ASEE Board of Directors

Best PIC Papers:

PIC I

Title: Development of Interactive Virtual Laboratories to Help Students Learn Difficult Concepts in Thermodynamics
Author: Milo Koretsky. Oregon State University
Co-Author: Alec Bowen, Oregon State University; Daniel Reid, Oregon State University

PIC II

Title: The Design Problem Framework: Using Adaption-Innovation Theory to Construct Design Problem Statements
Author: Eli Silk, University of Michigan
Co-Author: Shanna Daly, University of Michigan; Kathryn Jablokow, Pennsylvania State University; Seda Yilmaz, Iowa State University; Meisha Rosenburg, Iowa State University

PIC III

Title: Student Performance Enhancements via an Active, Integrated Engineering Physics Course
Author: Timothy Garrison, York College of Pennsylvania

PIC IV

Title: Perspectives on Failure in the Classroom by Elementary Teachers New to Teaching Engineering
Author: Pamela S Lottero-Perdue , Towson University
Co-Author: Elizabeth Parry, North Carolina State University

PIC V

Title: More than Advice: Increasing Industry Advisory Board Member Involvement
Author: James Jones, Ball State University

Best Zone Papers:

Zone I

Title: The Impact of Peer Interaction Exercise in a Signals & Systems Course
Author: Scott Sinex, Prince Georges Community College

Zone II

Title: Problem-Based Learning to Promote Student Creativity
Authors: Douglas Tugow & Jeffrey Will, Valparaiso University

Zone III

Title: The Impact of Peer Interaction Exercise in a Signals & Systems Course
Author: David H. Koe, University of Texas, Tyler

Zone IV

Title: Teaching Bioinformarics in Concert: an Interdisciplinary Collaborative Project-Based Experience
Author: Alex Dekhtyar, Anya L. Goodman, Aldrin Montana, Cal Poly San Obispo

W363 - DISTINGUISHED LECTURE - Unifying the Enablers for Innovation and the Talent for Making Value for America

Description:
Innovations in manufacturing are driving the nation’s economic engine, and actions in business, education and government are the centerpiece for prolonged success. The National Academy of Engineering recently launched a “Making Value for America” project to examine best practices and educational approaches that build 21st century workforce skills in today’s workforce. In 2011, a working group of the U.S. President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) created the Advanced Manufacturing Partnership (AMP) to recommend improvements to the innovation ecosystem, secure the talent pipeline and improve the business climate. That Partnership concluded its efforts in 2014 with a second report aimed at accelerating the budding resurgence in the U.S. advanced manufacturing sector.

Manufacturing research infrastructure is now emerging for U.S. industry and academia to solve industry-relevant problems, organized around a network of “Institutes for Manufacturing Innovation” recommended by the first AMP report. These Institutes are part of a National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI) and are partnerships of all stakeholders: industry and industry organizations, government and academia. They are engaging a wide range of industry and academic partners in activities influencing and creating best practices and educational approaches for building workforce skills at all levels and enhancing manufacturing capabilities in companies large and small.
This session unifies the insights from the AMP reports and the Making Value for America study. Its focus is on the emerging directions, trends and resources for research, innovation and talent development to grow the economy.
The various facets of innovation, engineering education, research and best practices are depicted through perspectives of industry, education and government. Understanding the connectivity and opportunities for each sector is intended help each support the roles in which they can engage to be an integral part of the growing innovation economy.

 Emcee:

C. Diane Matt, CAE
 Executive Director
 WEPAN, Inc.
 

Diane Matt is a Certified Association Executive with 20-plus years of experience in leading not-for-profit organizations.  She was formerly the Director of Strategic Partnerships for the Geological Society of America, a non-profit organization of 17,000 members dedicated to the advancement of the geosciences, and also served as Executive Director of the Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado. 

According to WEPAN Past President Sherry Woods, "Diane's background in leadership, management, volunteer development, and strategic planning will strengthen WEPAN's impact as a national leader in promoting opportunities for women in engineering. Diane knows the challenges of being a female student and practitioner in science. She understands what our members and organization face." She has received numerous awards, including the Colorado Society of Association Executives Annual Association Executive Award of Excellence and the Green Industry Person of the Year award. She is a geoscientist with B.A. and M.S. degrees from Indiana University and The University of Calgary, respectively. Matt resides in Denver, Colorado.


Moderator:
Carrie Houtman 
Government Affairs Director
The Dow Chemical Company
 

Carrie Houtman is the Government Affairs Director for The Dow Chemical Company, supporting the development of Dow's positions on matters of national and state public policy. She assumed the role of North America STEM Implementation leader in October following more than a year focused on education policy. Prior to her appointment in public policy, she was responsible for the global product stewardship activity for Dow's basic and specialty chemicals divisions, overseeing regulatory requirements on a range of chemical management issues. Carrie has also lead efforts in characterizing product hazards and conducting risk assessments, and was project leader for the team that created nearly 300 Product Safety Assessments in support of Dow's 2015 Sustainability Goals. Carrie began her career with Dow in 1996 in technical service and development for Emulsion Polymers and Dow Microbial Control, followed by various assignments in Dow's industrial toxicology laboratory. She is a graduate of The Pennsylvania State University, with a BA in General Arts and Sciences, and is a certified Six Sigma Black Belt.

Panelists:

Jerry Young
Director Advanced Manufacturing & Materials
Boeing Commercial Airplanes

Jerry leads Advanced Manufacturing & Materials for Boeing Commercial Airplane's Product Development organization. This team is responsible for maturing technologies for insertion into next generation products and the production system. Prior to this assignment, Jerry led Materials and Manufacturing Technology for Boeing Research & Technology with responsibility for finding and maturing next generation technology for Boeing's future products.
He has worked on a variety of programs for Boeing's defense and commercial businesses including B2, JSF, F22, 777 and 787. He holds a BS and MS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Utah and is a graduate of the Advanced Management Program at University of Pennsylvania's Wharton Business School. He also holds four patents, authored a number of technical papers and is a member of ASME and SAMPE.

S. Jack Hu
Interim Vice President for Research
The University of Michigan

S. Jack Hu was appointed the Interim Vice President for Research at the University of Michigan, effective January 1, 2014. He is also Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Professor of Industrial and Operations Engineering, and the J. Reid and Polly Anderson Professor of Manufacturing Technology in the College of Engineering. 
As the Vice President for Research, Dr. Hu has overall responsibility for nurturing the excellence and integrity of research across the entire campus. He oversees the U-M Office of Research, which promotes interdisciplinary research, develops and implements research policy, provides central administrative services in support of faculty research, innovation, and economic outreach, and manages activities related to compliance and the responsible conduct of research. Before his current appointment, Dr. Hu served as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs (2009–2013) and Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Education (2007–2009), both in the College of Engineering at the University of Michigan.
Dr. Hu’s teaching and research interests include manufacturing systems design and operations, assembly modeling, and statistical quality methods.  He is the recipient of various awards, including the SME Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineer Award, National Science Foundation CAREER Award, ASME William T. Ennor Manufacturing Technology Award, the College of Engineering Research Excellence Award, and several best paper awards.  He is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and a fellow of the International Academy for Production Engineering (CIRP). He served as the Editor in Chief of Journal of Manufacturing Systems from 2008 to 2013.
Dr. Hu received his B.S. from Tianjin University, China in 1983, M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1986 and 1990 respectively.

Mark J. Shuart, Ph.D.
R&D Facilities Program Manager
Advanced Manufacturing Office
 

Dr. Mark J. Shuart is the R&D Facilities Program Manager for the Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Office of the Department of Energy.  His research interests focus on establishing shared manufacturing facilities that develop advanced technologies for energy efficient applications. He leads the AMO team that creates and manages manufacturing development facilities, energy innovation hubs, and manufacturing innovation institutes.  He is also a Research Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Virginia Tech.  Prior to joining the Department of Energy, Dr. Shuart retired from the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) after 32 years of service. Dr. Shuart held several line management positions at the LaRC including Director for Structures & Materials and was a member of the Senior Executive Service from 1998 until his retirement.  
 Dr. Shuart is an internationally recognized authority on the behavior of composite materials and structures.  He has directed major contracts with Boeing, the former McDonnell Douglas, and Lockheed-Martin to develop composite structures technology for primary aircraft structures.  He has also directed grant activities at major universities. Dr. Shuart is the author or co-author of more than 80 formal publications, referable oral presentations, and other significant contributions that describe advanced structures and materials technologies. He holds a Bachelor of Science with Distinction in Engineering Science and Mechanics as well as a Master of Science in Engineering Mechanics from Virginia Tech.  He holds a Ph.D. in Applied Sciences/Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering from the University of Delaware.  Dr. Shuart completed the Program for Management Development at the Harvard Business School and Leadership for a Democratic Society at the Federal Executive Institute.  He has received the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal for his contributions to structures and materials research.  He is an Associate Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and is a past Chairman of their Materials Technical Committee. He has also received the Outstanding Alumni Award from the Center for Composite Materials at the University of Delaware. He lives in Alexandria, Virginia, with his wife, Jane. 

Kate S. Whitefoot
Senior program officer and the Robert A. Pritzker fellow
National Academy of Engineering

Dr. Kate S. Whitefoot is a senior program officer and the Robert A. Pritzker fellow at the National Academy of Engineering. In this capacity, she directs the NAE’s portfolio of programs on Manufacturing, Design, and Innovation, conceptualizing and managing studies on technology change and its impact on manufacturing and high-tech industries, the environment, and innovation and education policy.
Dr. Whitefoot co-edited the NAE report on Making Value for America. She has also published several studies analyzing the influence of energy policies on manufacturers’ product design decisions and consequent environmental emissions. This work appears in the Journal of Industrial Ecology, Energy Policy, the Journal of Mechanical Design, and other publications and is featured in the Washington Post and Popular Mechanics.

 

W371 - DISTINGUISHED LECTURE - Presented by PTC - The Internet of Things; A Smart Connected Crisis?

Smart products, embedded with sensors and mechanisms that link them through the Internet, are turning the physical world into an information system. This new wave of innovation connects everything, from homes to Happy Meals. The number of things connected to the Internet now exceeds the total number of humans on the planet, and we're accelerating to as many as 50 billion connected devices by the end of the decade.

It's clear that in an effort to remain competitive, manufacturing companies stand in front of the third wave of IT driven competition.

Projections indicate that by 2025, 80 to 100 percent of all manufacturers will be using IoT (Internet of Things) applications, leading to a potential economic impact of as much as $2.3 trillion for the global manufacturing industry. The Economist and Mackenzie Consultants suggest that as a direct result there may be as many as two million jobs left unfilled globally in “information and communication technologies”. It seems engineering educators likely face the next STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) crisis. Some might say that The Internet of Things “changes everything,” but that is a dangerous oversimplification.

The continued meteoric growth of the Internet of Things (IoT), with billions of connected products worldwide, hinges on a crucial ingredient. Education. The distributed global design process and embedded software has meant an understanding of smart, connected product development has become a necessary skill for graduates.

In direct response to our survey of global manufactures “manufacturing transformation”, PTC will present the outcomes of a project conducted in partnership with the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and demonstrate how to leverage free classroom IoT toolkit. This toolkit will let students come up with ideas for connected products, design their mechanical parts using 3D modeling software, print them with a 3D printer, add inexpensive sensors, and put together their own monitoring and control applications.

Speakers

Mr. John Stuart
Parametric Technology Corp.
Senior Vice President, Global Academic Programs

 

 

 

Dr. Alister Fraser
Parametric Technology Corp.
Senior Manager, Education Partner Programs for the Americas

 

 

 

W371A - DISTINGUISHED LECTURE - Internet for Everyone and Everything: Enabling The Future of System Design from Education to Advanced Research

Dave Wilson
Director of Academic Programs
National Instruments

With the widespread adoption of smart devices, wireless consumers’ demand for data has increased exponentially. The mobile Internet encourages innovation and inspires researchers to think beyond faster data and greater capacity. New networks, referred to as fifth generation or 5G, may unleash enormous economic potential. Many researchers view 5G as an inflection point—an opportunity to expand the capabilities of our wireless networks and perhaps redefine the term “network.” This is just one example of challenges that engineers are facing in this Internet of Things era. Due to these increased complexities, applying traditional “siloed” design approaches to meet 5G challenges could in fact be the bottleneck preventing a new network vision because these approaches tend to “reinvent the wheel” and impede managing the system complexities created by advancements in communication, computation, and control technologies.

In this session, Dave Wilson of NI explores the evolution of system design as a discipline to address the challenges of the Internet of Things era. He also discusses how new approaches can be applied from engineering education at the foundational levels of learning, can scale up to solve advanced research challenges as well as give students relevant hands-on experience they will be asked to perform once they graduate.

As the Director of Academic Programs for National Instruments, Dave Wilson works with the both NI headquarters and more than 45 NI branches around the globe. He ensures the most effective product proficiency development strategies and tactics are implemented worldwide.

Before joining NI, Dave worked for the Xerox Corporation and Keithley Instruments as a research engineer and software developer. Upon joining NI in 1991 as a Michigan-area district sales manager, he began driving the adoption of NI measurement and automation solutions throughout the automotive industry. In this role, he presented more than 50 technical seminars, wrote hundreds of applications with customers, and received multiple industry recognition awards.

In 1995, Wilson became the director of data acquisition marketing where he led several successful launches for products that have become key parts of the NI product line including motion control, Vision, DAQ boards, and PXI. He also developed product and corporate messages and led initiatives to work with R&D to incorporate customer-recommended features into new products. In 2000, Wilson became the international sales director for NI Japan where he led the branch to record growth.

Wilson has delivered more than 60 keynotes about the application of next-generation technologies in 30 countries in Asia, Europe and the Americas. He has met with the ministers of education in both Russia and Kosovo and many Deans of engineering to discuss ways to adopt new generation technologies for science and engineering in university curricula. He has also authored numerous articles and interviewed with multiple domestic and international publications including EE Times Asia, Bits & Chips, Evaluation Engineering, Desktop Engineering, and Sensors.

 

TOPˆ

Sponsors

Co-Hosts

University of Washington


Visionary


Innovator

NCEES Purdue University
National Instruments McGraw Hill Education


Pioneer

MathWorks Northrop Grumman
PTC Dassault
Boeing WebsEdge
Lockheed Martin Texas Instruments
The Lemelson Foundation


Mentor

University of Florida kaplan
USC Viterbi Columbia Video Network


Educator

CD-adapco Shell Eco-Marathon
Keysight Technologies ARM
ST Microelectronics Missouri University of Science and Technology
University of Portland

Thank you to all of our 2015 sponsors!

TOPˆ

Exhibitors

2015 Annual Conference Exhibitor List

Download as a CSV
Displaying results 51 - 100 of 116 in total
Exhibitor name ( ) Booths ( )
Intelitek, Inc. 217
Keysight Technologies 611
Labcenter Electronics 143
Lucas-Nuelle, Inc 426
MakerBot 228
Mastercam 235
MathWorks 323
Matrix Technology Solutions 331
McGraw-Hill 617
Mentis Sciences 625
Microchip Technology, Inc. 722
Minitab, Inc. 442
Momentum Press 640
Morgan and Claypool Publishers 642
MTAB USA 246
Museum of Science 242
National Academies Press 545
National Council of Examiners for Engineers & Surveying 318
National Instruments 211
National Science Foundation 534
NIST 131
Oxford University Press 344
Parametric Technology Corp. 419
PASCO scientific 622
Pearson Education 523
Piazza 224
Pitsco Education 117
Project Management Institute 337
Purdue University, West Lafayette (College of Engineering) 535, 537
Quanser Consulting, Inc. 328
RAPID 244
Rigol Technologies 229
RoboNation/SeaPerch 644
SAE International 616
SAS Institute, Inc. - JMP Division 711
Seattle University 343
Shell Eco-Marathon 241
Siglent Technologies 543
SolidWorks Corporation 746
SparkFun Electronics 728
Spectra Quest, Inc. 511
SPIE Digital Library 647
Stratasys 111
Sun Equipment Corporation 240
Tecnologico de Monterrey 125
Tecquipment 339
Texas A&M University 441
Texas Instruments, Inc. 313
The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 715
The Institute of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineers 544
Displaying results 51 - 100 of 116 in total

 

Join the American Society for Engineering Education in
Seattle, Washington for the 122nd Annual Conference & Exposition
Making Value for Society
June 14 – 17, 2015

The ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition is the only conference dedicated to all disciplines of engineering and engineering technology education. As the premier event of its kind, the ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition fosters an exchange of ideas, enhances teaching methods and curricula, and provides unparalleled networking opportunities for engineering and technology education stakeholders including deans, faculty members, researchers, and industry and government professionals.

The conference features more than 400 technical sessions, with peer-reviewed papers spanning all disciplines of engineering education; distinguished lectures including the main plenary; award receptions and banquets; the “Greet the Stars” orientation for new ASEE members and first-time conference attendees; and the ASEE Division Mixer. The Exhibit Hall is also home to several exciting events, including the “Focus on Exhibits” Welcome Reception, Brunch, Summertime Social and Luncheon. We look forward to welcoming you to Seattle!

2015 Highlights

M204 - Main Plenary I

Date: Monday, June 15, 2015
Location: Washington State Convention Center
Time: 8:45 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Keynote Speaker: Maria Klawe

Maria Klawe - President of Harvey Mudd CollegeHarvey Mudd College is led by Maria Klawe, the College’s fifth president, who began her tenure in 2006. A renowned mathematician, computer scientist and scholar, President Klawe is the first woman to lead the College since its founding in 1955. Prior to joining Harvey Mudd, she served as dean of engineering and professor of computer science at Princeton University. During her time at Princeton, Klawe led the School of Engineering and Applied Science through a strategic planning exercise that created an exciting and widely embraced vision for the school. At Harvey Mudd College, she led a similarly ambitious strategic planning initiative, “HMC 2020: Envisioning the Future.”

 

Kai KightFeaturing:

Kai Kight, a former engineering student and a product of Stanford University's Innovation Mecca, the Design School, combines beautiful violin music with insights on engineering and design. “Innovation happens at intersections,” he notes, citing his efforts to combine classical music with hip hop. His presentations ask the question: “Are you writing new music, or are you just playing notes that have been written for you?”

This session will also feature the 2015 President’s Award Recipient:

For Inspiration and Recognition in Science and Technology (FIRST) Accepted by FIRST Executive Advisory Board member

Woodie C FlowersDr. Woodie Flowers
Pappalardo Professor Emeritus
Mechanical Engineering
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

 

 

 

And National High School STEM Winners

Intel Science Fair
Student:
Kalia Firester, Hunter College High School, New York, NY – 2015

Kalia Firester, 18, is a senior at Hunter College High School in New York City. She is the 2015 Intel Science Talent Search Second Place winner in the category of Global Good, and a Second Award Winner at the 2013 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair for her work in engineering crop plants to defend against parasitic nematodes on their own, obviating the need for chemical pesticides. Her method involved identifying how a protein produced by parasitic nematodes disrupted plant defenses and enabled parasitic development. By genetically engineering plants to express or degrade this protein, she found that the protein was essential for sustaining the parasite in the plant. But plants she engineered to eliminate that protein, halted nematode development. This work was done at the Agricultural Research Organization in Israel. Firester also was the 2011 and 2012 national winner of the American Museum of Natural History's Young Naturalist Awards for her discovery of an innovative natural insecticide, and her biological water filtration system purifying gray water utilizing a novel water plant. Those projects were done in Firester's kitchen. Most recently, Kalia interned at the Lab of Molecular Parasitology and Lymphocyte Biology at Rockefeller University where she studied African trypanosomes. At Hunter, she is a teaching intern in research biology. Aside from science, Firester earned a visual and digital arts certificate from Parsons The New School for Design's Pre-College Academy. She is a member of Young Playwrights, Inc. and a recipient of numerous Scholastic Art & Writing Awards in visual arts and writing. To her art pursuits, she credits the creative methodology that assists in finding scientific solutions. In college, she plans to major in molecular biology and visual arts.

Engineering Programs in Community Service (EPICS), Purdue University
Student:
Teresa Dinh, Sammamish High School, Bellevue, WA – 2016

I am a junior at Sammamish High School (Bellevue, WA) planning to attend college after graduation. I have a strong interest in pursuing a career in engineering that was fueled by my experience at SHS. I was first introduced to engineering during my sophomore year when took my first engineering class at SHS. Before that, I didn't know much about engineering or what real-world engineers do, I just thought that “engineers engineer stuff”.

During my first engineering class, I began developing my design skills and problem solving skills, and started to get an idea of what engineering encompasses. I feel like this year (my junior year) there has been a big jump in my engineering skill development and my interest in engineering. This is a result of the work I completed on my EPIC project, modifying 12V motorized cars for handicapped students. The project challenged me and helped me grow in many ways. As example, before the project, I had never used CAD. Through this project, I learned how to use CAD and print parts on a 3D printer. I brainstormed and created prototypes for my 3D button leading to the final design solution. This process really helped me expand my problem solving skills, as when one design failed, I analyzed the problem to improve the design ending with a final design that met the requirements of the project. It took a lot of patience to fail multiple times and not always feel like I was making forward progress; however, I stayed motivated and was able to find the right solution. This experience taught me the nature of engineering. Engineers are destined to fail at some point in the design process. Failure is crucial to finding the optimal solution. This understanding that failure is necessary for success will help me overcome failures in the future.

My EPICS project also helped develop my interest in engineering, as I really enjoyed helping my stakeholder solve their problems, and I realized that engineering really is all about helping people! I have signed up again next year for another engineering class, with the goal of completing another project for new stakeholder and continue building my skills and interest in engineering.

Engineering Programs in Community Service (EPICS), Purdue University
Student:
Nick DeGallier, Sammamish High School, Bellevue, WA – 2015

I am a senior at Sammamish High School and will be graduating this spring. Next year I plan to attend Claremont McKenna College where I will major in Economics and play baseball.

I chose to take engineering classes in high school because I was interested in engineering and wanted to improve my problem solving skills. At the end of my junior year our class constructed an 18 foot cardboard bridge that held 3118 pounds. In the building process I was the leader of the group tasked with building and designing the 18 foot horizontal beams, the foundation of the bridge. This experience was thrilling and I became hooked on the design process.

My engineering experience during senior year has been even better. I have modified 12 volt cars for physically handicapped children. Along the way I have learned a variety of useful trades like 3D printing, wiring, and craftsmanship. This project has been extremely fulfilling and exciting because its impact expands beyond the walls of my high school. Benefiting children is one of my passions, and my project helps alleviate physical barriers that hinders the cognitive development of physically handicapped children.

The EPICS program at my high school has allowed me to experience the stimulation of serving others with problem solving expertise. As a result I have set my sights on a career of service. My ideal career is one where I can use economic and financial expertise to solve real world problems. One example includes working at non-profits like the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to collaborate on matters like education, and poverty and working for a government agency like the Office of Budget and Management to help close the widening inequality of wealth in America.

First Robotics Competition
Student:
Parker Owen, for the last year Parker has been developing a business that has a unique way of delivering on campus advertising for third party entities. He is not currently enrolled in an education institution.

Parker Owen is an entrepreneur, inventor and Founder/CEO of Frapz Advertising LLC. Born and raised in Birmingham, Alabama, Parker grew up in an entrepreneurial household — his father owned a successful sign company specializing in branded vehicle wraps, while his grandmother owned one of the state's very first storage unit companies.

A marketing visionary, Parker developed a unique way to merge both of these worlds and formed Frapz Advertising LLC — a groundbreaking approach to monetizing the empty physical space of everyday electronics with sleek vinyl advertising. The new enterprise connects businesses with their target customers in the concentrated urban areas in which they live, work and play. By leasing the back “real-estate” of personal electronic devices such as phones, laptops, ext.., businesses can capitalize on this previously vacant space by advertising their business in a very understated way.

Parker attributes much of his success to his participation in FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology), an afterschool program that shows students of every age that science, technology and problem-solving are not only fun and rewarding, but are proven paths to successful careers. Parker is living proof of that and his passion for the program continues to motivate him to remain active in the FIRST program whenever he can.

“For the many problems in the work, FIRST is a solution that empowers and equips the next generation to do more and go farther than ever thought possible” says Parker. His experience with FIRST and his own recent success has inspired him to create a STEM based program that would serve as a resource to up-and-coming entrepreneurs and inventors. Through collaboration with several education organizations, Parker hopes this initiative will help others connect and network with the right people in order to bring their businesses and products to market.

Parker hold patents pending for Frapz as well for the world-famous Cycle-Leg–a low cost prosthetic leg made from the single bicycle. At 17, Parker's brainchild will revolutionize the prosthetic industry by affording greater global access to those in need. The Cycle-Leg was awarded the FIRST Future Innovators Award which garnered worldwide attention and recognition for Parker and earned him an invitation to the 2014 White House Science Expo as well as an audience with President Obama.

Features in national publications such as “Wired” magazine, the “Birmingham News” and online newsfeeds like AOL.com and A1.com soon followed as well as interview with the CEO of Time Warner Cable, Bill Nye, “The Science Guy” and Kari Byron from the TV show “MythBusters”.

Because of the life changing advice Parker received from his mentor and FIRST Founder Dean Kamen, he is especially passionate about his new initiatives. “I remember asking Dean, ‘How do I go from being a kid from Alabama to being you?’ Dean gave me one of the three most important pieces of advice I had ever received”, he continued, “He told me ‘You're not going to do it alone–it takes people, so partner with the right people’.”

Parker continues to follow that advice to this day.

Conrad Spirit of Innovation Challenge
Student:
Savannah Cofer, Columbus Academy, Columbus, OH – 2015

Savannah Cofer is a senior at Columbus Academy in Columbus, Ohio. For the past 8 years, she has won numerous awards at international robotics tournaments as part of the FIRST organization. Savannah is passionate about developing innovations that can address real world problems. Her innovations include self-cleaning grocery conveyor belts, earthquake resistant housing for the third world, a system to protect bicyclists & soldiers, and a device to reduce essential hand tremors. Savannah is a two time winner of the Conrad Spirit of Innovation Awards, Moonbots Google Lunar X-Prize, and the Christopher Columbus Awards.

Conrad Spirit of Innovation Challenge
Student:
Varun Vallabhaneni, Columbus Academy, Columbus, OH – 2015

Varun Vallabhaneni is a senior at Columbus Academy and has a passion for STEM related activities. Since lower school, he has had the opportunity to compete in national and international STEM competitions ranging from First Lego League Robotics to scientific research and entrepreneurial competitions. His favorite subjects in school are science and history, but he has a particular inclination towards the field of biology. When not building robots, doing research, or studying, he loves to watch Netflix, play tennis, or spend time with my friends/family! Varun is a two time winner of the Conrad Spirit of Innovation Awards, Moonbots Google Lunar X-Prize, and the Christopher Columbus Awards.

By Kids for Kids
Student:
Hana Bidon, Engineering and Science University Magnet School, Hamden, CT– 2016

Hana Bidon is a junior at the Engineering and Science University Magnet School (ESUMS) in Hamden, CT. In school, she participates in Science Olympiad as well as the Math club and the high school band. Outside of school, she participates in Peabody Evolutions (after school program) in addition to the Greater Bridgeport Youth Orchestras (GBYO) as a violinist. This year, she has won the Sikorsky Helicopter 2050 challenge with her helicopter design, Skylift 968. Unlike existing helicopters, this helicopter is made out of recycled fiber - composite material, which uses 3d vascular networks to self-heal. As a result, this helicopter can automatically repair cracks with the aid of a technician.

T357 - Main Plenary II

Date: Tuesday, June 16, 2015
Location: Washington State Convention Center
Time: 10:30 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Best Paper Award Recognition and Corporate Member Council Industry Day Keynote Speaker.

Most Outstanding Teaching Award:

Robert M. Brooks

Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Temple University

2014 Best Overall Zone Paper:

Title: Investigating & Visualizing Measurement Error for Novice “STEM” Learners

Author: Scott A. Sinex, Prince George's Community College, Largo, MD

2014 Best Overall Conference Paper:

Title: Perspectives on Failure in the Classroom by Elementary Teachers New to Teaching Engineering

Author: Pamela Lottero-Perdue, Towson University

Co-Authors: Elizabeth A. Parry, North Carolina State University

Keynote Speaker:

Dr John J Tracy - CTO The Boeing CompanyDr. John J. Tracy is chief technology officer of The Boeing Company and senior vice president of Engineering, Operations & Technology. He reports to Boeing Chairman, President and CEO Jim McNerney.

In addition to serving on the company's Executive Council, he oversees the development and implementation of the enterprise technology investment strategy and provides strategic direction to several functions and business organizations comprising more than 100,000 employees. These include the Engineering, Operations, and Supplier Management functions, and also the Information Technology, Test & Evaluation, Enterprise Technology Strategy, Intellectual Property Management, Research & Technology, and Environment, Health and Safety organizations.

Previously Tracy was vice president of Engineering & Mission Assurance for Boeing Integrated Defense Systems. Tracy had functional management responsibility for the IDS engineering processes, engineering tools, and the 32,000-person engineering team. Prior to this assignment, Tracy was vice president of Structural Technologies, Prototyping, and Quality for the Boeing Phantom Works advanced R&D unit, where he was responsible for advanced materials and processes, structural design and analysis, manufacturing technology, prototype development, and the Phantom Works Quality function.

Tracy has also served as the general manager of Engineering for Boeing Military Aircraft and Missiles in Southern California, the director of the Space and Communications Advanced Engineering organization, the director of Operations Management, and director of Structures Technology for Southern California Phantom Works. He joined McDonnell Douglas as a stress analyst in Huntington Beach in 1981, after serving as a high school science teacher in Los Angeles.

Tracy is a Member of the National Academy of Engineering and is a Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the Royal Aeronautical Society. He is also a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and the past chair of the ASME 6,000-member Aerospace Division.

Tracy has authored more than 30 publications in the areas of composite structural mechanics, launch vehicle structures, smart structures, and aging aircraft. He currently serves on the Board of Trustees for the Illinois Institute of Technology and on the engineering advisory board for several leading universities.

Tracy received a PhD in Engineering (1987) from the University of California-Irvine, and a master's degree and a bachelor's degree in Physics respectively from California State University-Los Angeles (1981) and California State University-Dominguez Hills (1976).

He is married to Katherine Katsumata Tracy, and they have two grown children: Scott Tracy and Wendy MacGinnis

T664 - Best Zone Paper Competition

Best Zone Papers: I-IV
Technical - Council of Sections
Date: Tuesday, June 16, 2015
Location: Washington State Convention Center
Time: 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM.

Zone I

Title: A Deeper Understanding of Technology is Needed for Workforce Readiness – Playing Games, Texting, and Tweets Aren't Enough to Make Students Tech-Savvy
Authors: Best We Can Be, Inc. - Teresa Piliouras, AITE High School - Raymond Yu, Kristin Villanueva, Yingxin Chen, Holly Robillard, Michael Berson, Jeanne Lauer, Garret Sampel, Daniel Lapinski, Maigh Attre

Zone II

Title: The Da Vinci Foundry: A Powerful Learning and Thinking System to Develop the 21st Century Renaissance Engineer
Authors: P. E. Arce,Tennessee Technological University, J. Biernacki, Tennessee Technological University, J. Pascal, Tennessee Technological University, J. R. Sanders, Tennessee Technological University

Zone III

Title: Correlating Engineering Statics Student Performance with Scores of a Test over Pre-requisite Material Involving Problem Solving
Authors: Roy Myose, Wichita State University, Syed Raza, Wichita State University, Wichita State University, Klaus Hoffmann, Wichita State University, Armin Ghoddoussi, Wichita State University

Zone IV

Title: HSI STEM: Research Opportunities to Improve Retention and Increase the Pipeline to Graduate School
Authors: Gino Galvez, California State University, Long Beach, Eric Marinez, California State University, Long Beach, Alvaro Monge, California State University, Long Beach

 

Distinguished Lectures - Wednesday, June 17 - Sponsored By WebsEdge

Date: Wednesday, June 17, 2015
Location: Washington State Convention Center
Time: 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

W314A - DISTINGUISHED LECTURE: “Power to the People: Engineering Education and Energy Poverty Alleviation”: Presented by Professor Henry Louie & “A Framework for Catalyzing Change in Engineering Education”, Presented by Susan Elrod

Power to the People: Engineering Education and Energy Poverty Alleviation
Prof. Henry Louie - Seattle University

Dr. Henry Louie received his B.S.E.E. from Kettering University, his M.S. from the University of Illinois and his PhD from the University of Washington in 2008. He is an Associate Professor at Seattle University in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Dr. Louie serves on the Governing Board of the IEEE Power & Energy Society (PES), is the founding Secretary of the IEEE PES Working Group on Sustainable Energy Systems for Developing Countries and was Technical Program Co-Chair of the 2012 IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference. He has led energy development projects over several years in Zambia and Kenya and is a member of the IEEE PES Community Solutions Initiative, which seeks to use renewable energy and technology to improve lives of people in remote communities in a sustainable way. He is the recipient of the 2013 IEEE Region 6 Northwest Area Outstanding Educator award. Dr. Louie is a Senior Member of the IEEE and in 2014 was named a Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE for this talks related to energy poverty.

A Framework for Catalyzing Change in Engineering Education
Susan Elrod - Chico State University

Susan Elrod serves as the Interim Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs at California State University, Chico. She arrived in Chico in October 2014, after serving as Dean of the College of Science and Mathematics at California State University Fresno, where she led initiatives at the university, state and national levels that focused on improving student success and faculty development in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) disciplines, while enhancing support for research and expanding community and industry engagement. Prior to her work at Fresno, Elrod served as Executive Director of Project Kaleidoscope (PKAL) at the Association of American Colleges & Universities in Washington, DC. During her tenure at PKAL, she launched several multi-campus, national STEM education initiatives focused on interdisciplinary learning, sustainability, and STEM student transfer success. She also expanded PKAL's national program of regional faculty development networks and enhanced PKAL's Summer Leadership Institute for emerging faculty leaders in the STEM disciplines. She continues to serves as a senior scholar at AAC&U and as an advisor and research investigator on several national projects. Elrod holds a Ph.D. in Genetics from the University of California, Davis and a B.S. in Biological Science from California State University, Chico.

W333 - DISTINGUISHED LECTURE: To and Through: Creating an Ecosystem of Achievement for College Success

Karl Reid - National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE)

Karl Reid is the newly appointed Executive Director of the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE), a 30,000 plus membership organization in Alexandria, Virginia whose mission is to increase the number of culturally responsible black engineers who excel academically, succeed professionally and positively impact the community.

For more than 15 years, Dr. Reid has been a leading advocate for increasing college access and opportunity for low income and minority youth. Dr. Reid comes to NSBE from the United Negro College Fund where he served as senior vice president of research, innovation and member college engagement. He oversaw new program development, research and capacity building for the organization’s 37 historically black colleges and universities.

Prior to joining UNCF, Dr. Reid was Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education and Director of the Office of Minority Education at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he was responsible for the academic performance and leadership development of underrepresented minority students. He also served as Assistant to the MIT Chancellor for Student Diversity. Earlier in his career, Dr. Reid served for eight years as executive director of Engineering Outreach Programs for MIT's School of Engineering where he directed local and national college access programs that aimed to increase the number of students from underserved and underrepresented communities prepared to study science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

He also lectured on race, identity and academic achievement and served on MIT's Committee on Undergraduate Engineering Practice, the Committee on Campus Race Relations and the Presidential Task Force on Minority Student Achievement. Born and raised in New York City and Long Island, New York, Dr. Reid earned both his Bachelors and Masters of Science degrees in Materials Science and Engineering from MIT, and his Doctorate of Education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education. His research interests include exploring the relationships between racial identity and self-efficacy, and their influence on the academic achievement of African American males in higher education.

After graduating from MIT, Dr. Reid worked for 12 years in the computer industry in product management, marketing, sales and consulting for several companies including IBM where he won several regional and branch awards. Dr. Reid is a member of the Tau Beta Pi National Engineering Honor Society. Among other activities, he directs Christian education at the Reid Temple AME Church and blogs about academic achievement and success strategies.

Dr. Reid is a recipient of the NSBE Golden Torch Award for “Minority Engineering Program Director of the Year” and the Outstanding Advisor of the Year award from the MIT Academic Resource Center. He is also a recipient of the YMCA Black Achievers Award, the MIT Presidential Award for Community Service and the MIT Excellence Award for his outreach efforts. He and his wife Andrea live in Silver Spring, Maryland and have three children.

W351 - DISTINGUISHED LECTURE: National Academies Report on Career Choices of Women Engineers

Dr. Alice Merner Agogino - University of California, Berkeley

Professor Alice M. Agogino is Roscoe and Elizabeth Hughes Professor of Mechanical Engineering at University of California, Berkeley.

 

 

 

W357A - 2014 Best PIC & Best Zone Paper Presentations
Dist. Lecture: ASEE Board of Directors

Best PIC Papers:

PIC I

Title: Development of Interactive Virtual Laboratories to Help Students Learn Difficult Concepts in Thermodynamics
Author: Milo Koretsky. Oregon State University
Co-Author: Alec Bowen, Oregon State University; Daniel Reid, Oregon State University

PIC II

Title: The Design Problem Framework: Using Adaption-Innovation Theory to Construct Design Problem Statements
Author: Eli Silk, University of Michigan
Co-Author: Shanna Daly, University of Michigan; Kathryn Jablokow, Pennsylvania State University; Seda Yilmaz, Iowa State University; Meisha Rosenburg, Iowa State University

PIC III

Title: Student Performance Enhancements via an Active, Integrated Engineering Physics Course
Author: Timothy Garrison, York College of Pennsylvania

PIC IV

Title: Perspectives on Failure in the Classroom by Elementary Teachers New to Teaching Engineering
Author: Pamela S Lottero-Perdue , Towson University
Co-Author: Elizabeth Parry, North Carolina State University

PIC V

Title: More than Advice: Increasing Industry Advisory Board Member Involvement
Author: James Jones, Ball State University

Best Zone Papers:

Zone I

Title: The Impact of Peer Interaction Exercise in a Signals & Systems Course
Author: Scott Sinex, Prince Georges Community College

Zone II

Title: Problem-Based Learning to Promote Student Creativity
Authors: Douglas Tugow & Jeffrey Will, Valparaiso University

Zone III

Title: The Impact of Peer Interaction Exercise in a Signals & Systems Course
Author: David H. Koe, University of Texas, Tyler

Zone IV

Title: Teaching Bioinformarics in Concert: an Interdisciplinary Collaborative Project-Based Experience
Author: Alex Dekhtyar, Anya L. Goodman, Aldrin Montana, Cal Poly San Obispo

W363 - DISTINGUISHED LECTURE - Unifying the Enablers for Innovation and the Talent for Making Value for America

Description:
Innovations in manufacturing are driving the nation’s economic engine, and actions in business, education and government are the centerpiece for prolonged success. The National Academy of Engineering recently launched a “Making Value for America” project to examine best practices and educational approaches that build 21st century workforce skills in today’s workforce. In 2011, a working group of the U.S. President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) created the Advanced Manufacturing Partnership (AMP) to recommend improvements to the innovation ecosystem, secure the talent pipeline and improve the business climate. That Partnership concluded its efforts in 2014 with a second report aimed at accelerating the budding resurgence in the U.S. advanced manufacturing sector.

Manufacturing research infrastructure is now emerging for U.S. industry and academia to solve industry-relevant problems, organized around a network of “Institutes for Manufacturing Innovation” recommended by the first AMP report. These Institutes are part of a National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI) and are partnerships of all stakeholders: industry and industry organizations, government and academia. They are engaging a wide range of industry and academic partners in activities influencing and creating best practices and educational approaches for building workforce skills at all levels and enhancing manufacturing capabilities in companies large and small.
This session unifies the insights from the AMP reports and the Making Value for America study. Its focus is on the emerging directions, trends and resources for research, innovation and talent development to grow the economy.
The various facets of innovation, engineering education, research and best practices are depicted through perspectives of industry, education and government. Understanding the connectivity and opportunities for each sector is intended help each support the roles in which they can engage to be an integral part of the growing innovation economy.

 Emcee:

C. Diane Matt, CAE
 Executive Director
 WEPAN, Inc.
 

Diane Matt is a Certified Association Executive with 20-plus years of experience in leading not-for-profit organizations.  She was formerly the Director of Strategic Partnerships for the Geological Society of America, a non-profit organization of 17,000 members dedicated to the advancement of the geosciences, and also served as Executive Director of the Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado. 

According to WEPAN Past President Sherry Woods, "Diane's background in leadership, management, volunteer development, and strategic planning will strengthen WEPAN's impact as a national leader in promoting opportunities for women in engineering. Diane knows the challenges of being a female student and practitioner in science. She understands what our members and organization face." She has received numerous awards, including the Colorado Society of Association Executives Annual Association Executive Award of Excellence and the Green Industry Person of the Year award. She is a geoscientist with B.A. and M.S. degrees from Indiana University and The University of Calgary, respectively. Matt resides in Denver, Colorado.


Moderator:
Carrie Houtman 
Government Affairs Director
The Dow Chemical Company
 

Carrie Houtman is the Government Affairs Director for The Dow Chemical Company, supporting the development of Dow's positions on matters of national and state public policy. She assumed the role of North America STEM Implementation leader in October following more than a year focused on education policy. Prior to her appointment in public policy, she was responsible for the global product stewardship activity for Dow's basic and specialty chemicals divisions, overseeing regulatory requirements on a range of chemical management issues. Carrie has also lead efforts in characterizing product hazards and conducting risk assessments, and was project leader for the team that created nearly 300 Product Safety Assessments in support of Dow's 2015 Sustainability Goals. Carrie began her career with Dow in 1996 in technical service and development for Emulsion Polymers and Dow Microbial Control, followed by various assignments in Dow's industrial toxicology laboratory. She is a graduate of The Pennsylvania State University, with a BA in General Arts and Sciences, and is a certified Six Sigma Black Belt.

Panelists:

Jerry Young
Director Advanced Manufacturing & Materials
Boeing Commercial Airplanes

Jerry leads Advanced Manufacturing & Materials for Boeing Commercial Airplane's Product Development organization. This team is responsible for maturing technologies for insertion into next generation products and the production system. Prior to this assignment, Jerry led Materials and Manufacturing Technology for Boeing Research & Technology with responsibility for finding and maturing next generation technology for Boeing's future products.
He has worked on a variety of programs for Boeing's defense and commercial businesses including B2, JSF, F22, 777 and 787. He holds a BS and MS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Utah and is a graduate of the Advanced Management Program at University of Pennsylvania's Wharton Business School. He also holds four patents, authored a number of technical papers and is a member of ASME and SAMPE.

S. Jack Hu
Interim Vice President for Research
The University of Michigan

S. Jack Hu was appointed the Interim Vice President for Research at the University of Michigan, effective January 1, 2014. He is also Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Professor of Industrial and Operations Engineering, and the J. Reid and Polly Anderson Professor of Manufacturing Technology in the College of Engineering. 
As the Vice President for Research, Dr. Hu has overall responsibility for nurturing the excellence and integrity of research across the entire campus. He oversees the U-M Office of Research, which promotes interdisciplinary research, develops and implements research policy, provides central administrative services in support of faculty research, innovation, and economic outreach, and manages activities related to compliance and the responsible conduct of research. Before his current appointment, Dr. Hu served as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs (2009–2013) and Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Education (2007–2009), both in the College of Engineering at the University of Michigan.
Dr. Hu’s teaching and research interests include manufacturing systems design and operations, assembly modeling, and statistical quality methods.  He is the recipient of various awards, including the SME Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineer Award, National Science Foundation CAREER Award, ASME William T. Ennor Manufacturing Technology Award, the College of Engineering Research Excellence Award, and several best paper awards.  He is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and a fellow of the International Academy for Production Engineering (CIRP). He served as the Editor in Chief of Journal of Manufacturing Systems from 2008 to 2013.
Dr. Hu received his B.S. from Tianjin University, China in 1983, M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1986 and 1990 respectively.

Mark J. Shuart, Ph.D.
R&D Facilities Program Manager
Advanced Manufacturing Office
 

Dr. Mark J. Shuart is the R&D Facilities Program Manager for the Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Office of the Department of Energy.  His research interests focus on establishing shared manufacturing facilities that develop advanced technologies for energy efficient applications. He leads the AMO team that creates and manages manufacturing development facilities, energy innovation hubs, and manufacturing innovation institutes.  He is also a Research Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Virginia Tech.  Prior to joining the Department of Energy, Dr. Shuart retired from the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) after 32 years of service. Dr. Shuart held several line management positions at the LaRC including Director for Structures & Materials and was a member of the Senior Executive Service from 1998 until his retirement.  
 Dr. Shuart is an internationally recognized authority on the behavior of composite materials and structures.  He has directed major contracts with Boeing, the former McDonnell Douglas, and Lockheed-Martin to develop composite structures technology for primary aircraft structures.  He has also directed grant activities at major universities. Dr. Shuart is the author or co-author of more than 80 formal publications, referable oral presentations, and other significant contributions that describe advanced structures and materials technologies. He holds a Bachelor of Science with Distinction in Engineering Science and Mechanics as well as a Master of Science in Engineering Mechanics from Virginia Tech.  He holds a Ph.D. in Applied Sciences/Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering from the University of Delaware.  Dr. Shuart completed the Program for Management Development at the Harvard Business School and Leadership for a Democratic Society at the Federal Executive Institute.  He has received the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal for his contributions to structures and materials research.  He is an Associate Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and is a past Chairman of their Materials Technical Committee. He has also received the Outstanding Alumni Award from the Center for Composite Materials at the University of Delaware. He lives in Alexandria, Virginia, with his wife, Jane. 

Kate S. Whitefoot
Senior program officer and the Robert A. Pritzker fellow
National Academy of Engineering

Dr. Kate S. Whitefoot is a senior program officer and the Robert A. Pritzker fellow at the National Academy of Engineering. In this capacity, she directs the NAE’s portfolio of programs on Manufacturing, Design, and Innovation, conceptualizing and managing studies on technology change and its impact on manufacturing and high-tech industries, the environment, and innovation and education policy.
Dr. Whitefoot co-edited the NAE report on Making Value for America. She has also published several studies analyzing the influence of energy policies on manufacturers’ product design decisions and consequent environmental emissions. This work appears in the Journal of Industrial Ecology, Energy Policy, the Journal of Mechanical Design, and other publications and is featured in the Washington Post and Popular Mechanics.

 

W371 - DISTINGUISHED LECTURE - Presented by PTC - The Internet of Things; A Smart Connected Crisis?

Smart products, embedded with sensors and mechanisms that link them through the Internet, are turning the physical world into an information system. This new wave of innovation connects everything, from homes to Happy Meals. The number of things connected to the Internet now exceeds the total number of humans on the planet, and we're accelerating to as many as 50 billion connected devices by the end of the decade.

It's clear that in an effort to remain competitive, manufacturing companies stand in front of the third wave of IT driven competition.

Projections indicate that by 2025, 80 to 100 percent of all manufacturers will be using IoT (Internet of Things) applications, leading to a potential economic impact of as much as $2.3 trillion for the global manufacturing industry. The Economist and Mackenzie Consultants suggest that as a direct result there may be as many as two million jobs left unfilled globally in “information and communication technologies”. It seems engineering educators likely face the next STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) crisis. Some might say that The Internet of Things “changes everything,” but that is a dangerous oversimplification.

The continued meteoric growth of the Internet of Things (IoT), with billions of connected products worldwide, hinges on a crucial ingredient. Education. The distributed global design process and embedded software has meant an understanding of smart, connected product development has become a necessary skill for graduates.

In direct response to our survey of global manufactures “manufacturing transformation”, PTC will present the outcomes of a project conducted in partnership with the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and demonstrate how to leverage free classroom IoT toolkit. This toolkit will let students come up with ideas for connected products, design their mechanical parts using 3D modeling software, print them with a 3D printer, add inexpensive sensors, and put together their own monitoring and control applications.

Speakers

Mr. John Stuart
Parametric Technology Corp.
Senior Vice President, Global Academic Programs

 

 

 

Dr. Alister Fraser
Parametric Technology Corp.
Senior Manager, Education Partner Programs for the Americas

 

 

 

W371A - DISTINGUISHED LECTURE - Internet for Everyone and Everything: Enabling The Future of System Design from Education to Advanced Research

Dave Wilson
Director of Academic Programs
National Instruments

With the widespread adoption of smart devices, wireless consumers’ demand for data has increased exponentially. The mobile Internet encourages innovation and inspires researchers to think beyond faster data and greater capacity. New networks, referred to as fifth generation or 5G, may unleash enormous economic potential. Many researchers view 5G as an inflection point—an opportunity to expand the capabilities of our wireless networks and perhaps redefine the term “network.” This is just one example of challenges that engineers are facing in this Internet of Things era. Due to these increased complexities, applying traditional “siloed” design approaches to meet 5G challenges could in fact be the bottleneck preventing a new network vision because these approaches tend to “reinvent the wheel” and impede managing the system complexities created by advancements in communication, computation, and control technologies.

In this session, Dave Wilson of NI explores the evolution of system design as a discipline to address the challenges of the Internet of Things era. He also discusses how new approaches can be applied from engineering education at the foundational levels of learning, can scale up to solve advanced research challenges as well as give students relevant hands-on experience they will be asked to perform once they graduate.

As the Director of Academic Programs for National Instruments, Dave Wilson works with the both NI headquarters and more than 45 NI branches around the globe. He ensures the most effective product proficiency development strategies and tactics are implemented worldwide.

Before joining NI, Dave worked for the Xerox Corporation and Keithley Instruments as a research engineer and software developer. Upon joining NI in 1991 as a Michigan-area district sales manager, he began driving the adoption of NI measurement and automation solutions throughout the automotive industry. In this role, he presented more than 50 technical seminars, wrote hundreds of applications with customers, and received multiple industry recognition awards.

In 1995, Wilson became the director of data acquisition marketing where he led several successful launches for products that have become key parts of the NI product line including motion control, Vision, DAQ boards, and PXI. He also developed product and corporate messages and led initiatives to work with R&D to incorporate customer-recommended features into new products. In 2000, Wilson became the international sales director for NI Japan where he led the branch to record growth.

Wilson has delivered more than 60 keynotes about the application of next-generation technologies in 30 countries in Asia, Europe and the Americas. He has met with the ministers of education in both Russia and Kosovo and many Deans of engineering to discuss ways to adopt new generation technologies for science and engineering in university curricula. He has also authored numerous articles and interviewed with multiple domestic and international publications including EE Times Asia, Bits & Chips, Evaluation Engineering, Desktop Engineering, and Sensors.

 

TOPˆ

Sponsors

Co-Hosts

University of Washington


Visionary


Innovator

NCEES Purdue University
National Instruments McGraw Hill Education


Pioneer

MathWorks Northrop Grumman
PTC Dassault
Boeing WebsEdge
Lockheed Martin Texas Instruments
The Lemelson Foundation


Mentor

University of Florida kaplan
USC Viterbi Columbia Video Network


Educator

CD-adapco Shell Eco-Marathon
Keysight Technologies ARM
ST Microelectronics Missouri University of Science and Technology
University of Portland

Thank you to all of our 2015 sponsors!

TOPˆ

Exhibitors

2015 Annual Conference Exhibitor List

Download as a CSV
Displaying results 51 - 100 of 116 in total
Exhibitor name ( ) Booths ( )
Intelitek, Inc. 217
Keysight Technologies 611
Labcenter Electronics 143
Lucas-Nuelle, Inc 426
MakerBot 228
Mastercam 235
MathWorks 323
Matrix Technology Solutions 331
McGraw-Hill 617
Mentis Sciences 625
Microchip Technology, Inc. 722
Minitab, Inc. 442
Momentum Press 640
Morgan and Claypool Publishers 642
MTAB USA 246
Museum of Science 242
National Academies Press 545
National Council of Examiners for Engineers & Surveying 318
National Instruments 211
National Science Foundation 534
NIST 131
Oxford University Press 344
Parametric Technology Corp. 419
PASCO scientific 622
Pearson Education 523
Piazza 224
Pitsco Education 117
Project Management Institute 337
Purdue University, West Lafayette (College of Engineering) 535, 537
Quanser Consulting, Inc. 328
RAPID 244
Rigol Technologies 229
RoboNation/SeaPerch 644
SAE International 616
SAS Institute, Inc. - JMP Division 711
Seattle University 343
Shell Eco-Marathon 241
Siglent Technologies 543
SolidWorks Corporation 746
SparkFun Electronics 728
Spectra Quest, Inc. 511
SPIE Digital Library 647
Stratasys 111
Sun Equipment Corporation 240
Tecnologico de Monterrey 125
Tecquipment 339
Texas A&M University 441
Texas Instruments, Inc. 313
The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 715
The Institute of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineers 544
Displaying results 51 - 100 of 116 in total